Metering is a deprecated feature. Deprecated functionality is still included in OpenShift Container Platform and continues to be supported; however, it will be removed in a future release of this product and is not recommended for new deployments.

For the most recent list of major functionality that has been deprecated or removed within OpenShift Container Platform, refer to the Deprecated and removed features section of the OpenShift Container Platform release notes.

Use the following sections to help troubleshoot and debug specific issues with metering.

In addition to the information in this section, be sure to review the following topics:

Troubleshooting metering

A common issue with metering is pods failing to start. Pods might fail to start due to lack of resources or if they have a dependency on a resource that does not exist, such as a StorageClass or Secret resource.

Not enough compute resources

A common issue when installing or running metering is a lack of compute resources. As the cluster grows and more reports are created, the Reporting Operator pod requires more memory. If memory usage reaches the pod limit, the cluster considers the pod out of memory (OOM) and terminates it with an OOMKilled status. Ensure that metering is allocated the minimum resource requirements described in the installation prerequisites.

The Metering Operator does not autoscale the Reporting Operator based on the load in the cluster. Therefore, CPU usage for the Reporting Operator pod does not increase as the cluster grows.

To determine if the issue is with resources or scheduling, follow the troubleshooting instructions included in the Kubernetes document Managing Compute Resources for Containers.

To troubleshoot issues due to a lack of compute resources, check the following within the openshift-metering namespace.

Prerequisites
  • You are currently in the openshift-metering namespace. Change to the openshift-metering namespace by running:

    $ oc project openshift-metering
Procedure
  1. Check for metering Report resources that fail to complete and show the status of ReportingPeriodUnmetDependencies:

    $ oc get reports
    Example output
    NAME                                  QUERY                          SCHEDULE   RUNNING                            FAILED   LAST REPORT TIME       AGE
    namespace-cpu-utilization-adhoc-10    namespace-cpu-utilization                 Finished                                    2020-10-31T00:00:00Z   2m38s
    namespace-cpu-utilization-adhoc-11    namespace-cpu-utilization                 ReportingPeriodUnmetDependencies                                   2m23s
    namespace-memory-utilization-202010   namespace-memory-utilization              ReportingPeriodUnmetDependencies                                   26s
    namespace-memory-utilization-202011   namespace-memory-utilization              ReportingPeriodUnmetDependencies                                   14s
  2. Check the ReportDataSource resources where the NEWEST METRIC is less than the report end date:

    $ oc get reportdatasource
    Example output
    NAME                                         EARLIEST METRIC        NEWEST METRIC          IMPORT START           IMPORT END             LAST IMPORT TIME       AGE
    ...
    node-allocatable-cpu-cores                   2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-08-31T10:07:00Z   2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-10-15T17:13:00Z   2020-12-09T12:45:10Z   230d
    node-allocatable-memory-bytes                2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-08-30T05:19:00Z   2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-10-14T08:01:00Z   2020-12-09T12:45:12Z   230d
    ...
    pod-usage-memory-bytes                       2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-08-24T20:25:00Z   2020-04-23T09:14:00Z   2020-10-09T23:31:00Z   2020-12-09T12:45:12Z   230d
  3. Check the health of the reporting-operator Pod resource for a high number of pod restarts:

    $ oc get pods -l app=reporting-operator
    Example output
    NAME                                  READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    reporting-operator-84f7c9b7b6-fr697   2/2     Running   542        8d (1)
    
    1 The Reporting Operator pod is restarting at a high rate.
  4. Check the reporting-operator Pod resource for an OOMKilled termination:

    $ oc describe pod/reporting-operator-84f7c9b7b6-fr697
    Example output
    Name:         reporting-operator-84f7c9b7b6-fr697
    Namespace:    openshift-metering
    Priority:     0
    Node:         ip-10-xx-xx-xx.ap-southeast-1.compute.internal/10.xx.xx.xx
    ...
       Ports:          8080/TCP, 6060/TCP, 8082/TCP
       Host Ports:     0/TCP, 0/TCP, 0/TCP
       State:          Running
         Started:      Thu, 03 Dec 2020 20:59:45 +1000
       Last State:     Terminated
         Reason:       OOMKilled (1)
         Exit Code:    137
         Started:      Thu, 03 Dec 2020 20:38:05 +1000
         Finished:     Thu, 03 Dec 2020 20:59:43 +1000
    1 The Reporting Operator pod was terminated due to OOM kill.

Increasing the reporting-operator pod memory limit

If you are experiencing an increase in pod restarts and OOM kill events, you can check the current memory limit set for the Reporting Operator pod. Increasing the memory limit allows the Reporting Operator pod to update the report data sources. If necessary, increase the memory limit in your MeteringConfig resource by 25% - 50%.

Procedure
  1. Check the current memory limits of the reporting-operator Pod resource:

    $ oc describe pod reporting-operator-67d6f57c56-79mrt
    Example output
    Name:         reporting-operator-67d6f57c56-79mrt
    Namespace:    openshift-metering
    Priority:     0
    ...
       Ports:          8080/TCP, 6060/TCP, 8082/TCP
       Host Ports:     0/TCP, 0/TCP, 0/TCP
       State:          Running
         Started:      Tue, 08 Dec 2020 14:26:21 +1000
       Ready:          True
       Restart Count:  0
       Limits:
         cpu:     1
         memory:  500Mi (1)
       Requests:
         cpu:     500m
         memory:  250Mi
       Environment:
    ...
    1 The current memory limit for the Reporting Operator pod.
  2. Edit the MeteringConfig resource to update the memory limit:

    $ oc edit meteringconfig/operator-metering
    Example MeteringConfig resource
    kind: MeteringConfig
    metadata:
      name: operator-metering
      namespace: openshift-metering
    spec:
      reporting-operator:
      spec:
        resources: (1)
          limits:
            cpu: 1
            memory: 750Mi
          requests:
            cpu: 500m
            memory: 500Mi
    ...
    1 Add or increase memory limits within the resources field of the MeteringConfig resource.

    If there continue to be numerous OOM killed events after memory limits are increased, this might indicate that a different issue is causing the reports to be in a pending state.

StorageClass resource not configured

Metering requires that a default StorageClass resource be configured for dynamic provisioning.

See the documentation on configuring metering for information on how to check if there are any StorageClass resources configured for the cluster, how to set the default, and how to configure metering to use a storage class other than the default.

Secret not configured correctly

A common issue with metering is providing the incorrect secret when configuring your persistent storage. Be sure to review the example configuration files and create you secret according to the guidelines for your storage provider.

Debugging metering

Debugging metering is much easier when you interact directly with the various components. The sections below detail how you can connect and query Presto and Hive as well as view the dashboards of the Presto and HDFS components.

All of the commands in this section assume you have installed metering through OperatorHub in the openshift-metering namespace.

Get reporting operator logs

Use the command below to follow the logs of the reporting-operator:

$ oc -n openshift-metering logs -f "$(oc -n openshift-metering get pods -l app=reporting-operator -o name | cut -c 5-)" -c reporting-operator

Query Presto using presto-cli

The following command opens an interactive presto-cli session where you can query Presto. This session runs in the same container as Presto and launches an additional Java instance, which can create memory limits for the pod. If this occurs, you should increase the memory request and limits of the Presto pod.

By default, Presto is configured to communicate using TLS. You must use the following command to run Presto queries:

$ oc -n openshift-metering exec -it "$(oc -n openshift-metering get pods -l app=presto,presto=coordinator -o name | cut -d/ -f2)"  \
  -- /usr/local/bin/presto-cli --server https://presto:8080 --catalog hive --schema default --user root --keystore-path /opt/presto/tls/keystore.pem

Once you run this command, a prompt appears where you can run queries. Use the show tables from metering; query to view the list of tables:

$ presto:default> show tables from metering;
Example output
                                 Table

 datasource_your_namespace_cluster_cpu_capacity_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_cluster_cpu_usage_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_cluster_memory_capacity_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_cluster_memory_usage_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_node_allocatable_cpu_cores
 datasource_your_namespace_node_allocatable_memory_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_node_capacity_cpu_cores
 datasource_your_namespace_node_capacity_memory_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_node_cpu_allocatable_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_node_cpu_capacity_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_node_memory_allocatable_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_node_memory_capacity_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_capacity_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_capacity_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_phase
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_phase_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_request_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_request_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_with_phase_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_cpu_request_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_cpu_usage_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_limit_cpu_cores
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_limit_memory_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_memory_request_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_memory_usage_raw
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_persistentvolumeclaim_request_info
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_request_cpu_cores
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_request_memory_bytes
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_usage_cpu_cores
 datasource_your_namespace_pod_usage_memory_bytes
(32 rows)

Query 20190503_175727_00107_3venm, FINISHED, 1 node
Splits: 19 total, 19 done (100.00%)
0:02 [32 rows, 2.23KB] [19 rows/s, 1.37KB/s]

presto:default>

Query Hive using beeline

The following opens an interactive beeline session where you can query Hive. This session runs in the same container as Hive and launches an additional Java instance, which can create memory limits for the pod. If this occurs, you should increase the memory request and limits of the Hive pod.

$ oc -n openshift-metering exec -it $(oc -n openshift-metering get pods -l app=hive,hive=server -o name | cut -d/ -f2) \
  -c hiveserver2 -- beeline -u 'jdbc:hive2://127.0.0.1:10000/default;auth=noSasl'

Once you run this command, a prompt appears where you can run queries. Use the show tables; query to view the list of tables:

$ 0: jdbc:hive2://127.0.0.1:10000/default> show tables from metering;
Example output
+----------------------------------------------------+
|                      tab_name                      |
+----------------------------------------------------+
| datasource_your_namespace_cluster_cpu_capacity_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_cluster_cpu_usage_raw  |
| datasource_your_namespace_cluster_memory_capacity_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_cluster_memory_usage_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_allocatable_cpu_cores |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_allocatable_memory_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_capacity_cpu_cores |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_capacity_memory_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_cpu_allocatable_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_cpu_capacity_raw  |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_memory_allocatable_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_node_memory_capacity_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_capacity_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_capacity_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_phase |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_phase_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_request_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_request_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_persistentvolumeclaim_usage_with_phase_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_cpu_request_raw    |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_cpu_usage_raw      |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_limit_cpu_cores    |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_limit_memory_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_memory_request_raw |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_memory_usage_raw   |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_persistentvolumeclaim_request_info |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_request_cpu_cores  |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_request_memory_bytes |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_usage_cpu_cores    |
| datasource_your_namespace_pod_usage_memory_bytes |
+----------------------------------------------------+
32 rows selected (13.101 seconds)
0: jdbc:hive2://127.0.0.1:10000/default>

Port-forward to the Hive web UI

Run the following command to port-forward to the Hive web UI:

$ oc -n openshift-metering port-forward hive-server-0 10002

You can now open http://127.0.0.1:10002 in your browser window to view the Hive web interface.

Port-forward to HDFS

Run the following command to port-forward to the HDFS namenode:

$ oc -n openshift-metering port-forward hdfs-namenode-0 9870

You can now open http://127.0.0.1:9870 in your browser window to view the HDFS web interface.

Run the following command to port-forward to the first HDFS datanode:

$ oc -n openshift-metering port-forward hdfs-datanode-0 9864 (1)
1 To check other datanodes, replace hdfs-datanode-0 with the pod you want to view information on.

Metering Ansible Operator

Metering uses the Ansible Operator to watch and reconcile resources in a cluster environment. When debugging a failed metering installation, it can be helpful to view the Ansible logs or status of your MeteringConfig custom resource.

Accessing Ansible logs

In the default installation, the Metering Operator is deployed as a pod. In this case, you can check the logs of the Ansible container within this pod:

$ oc -n openshift-metering logs $(oc -n openshift-metering get pods -l app=metering-operator -o name | cut -d/ -f2) -c ansible

Alternatively, you can view the logs of the Operator container (replace -c ansible with -c operator) for condensed output.

Checking the MeteringConfig Status

It can be helpful to view the .status field of your MeteringConfig custom resource to debug any recent failures. The following command shows status messages with type Invalid:

$ oc -n openshift-metering get meteringconfig operator-metering -o=jsonpath='{.status.conditions[?(@.type=="Invalid")].message}'

Checking MeteringConfig Events

Check events that the Metering Operator is generating. This can be helpful during installation or upgrade to debug any resource failures. Sort events by the last timestamp:

$ oc -n openshift-metering get events --field-selector involvedObject.kind=MeteringConfig --sort-by='.lastTimestamp'
Example output with latest changes in the MeteringConfig resources
LAST SEEN   TYPE     REASON        OBJECT                             MESSAGE
4m40s       Normal   Validating    meteringconfig/operator-metering   Validating the user-provided configuration
4m30s       Normal   Started       meteringconfig/operator-metering   Configuring storage for the metering-ansible-operator
4m26s       Normal   Started       meteringconfig/operator-metering   Configuring TLS for the metering-ansible-operator
3m58s       Normal   Started       meteringconfig/operator-metering   Configuring reporting for the metering-ansible-operator
3m53s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling metering resources
3m47s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling monitoring resources
3m41s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling HDFS resources
3m23s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling Hive resources
2m59s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling Presto resources
2m35s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling reporting-operator resources
2m14s       Normal   Reconciling   meteringconfig/operator-metering   Reconciling reporting resources