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Understanding Service Mesh versions

In order to understand what version of Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh you have deployed on your system, you need to understand how each of the component versions is managed.

  • Operator version - The most current Operator version is 2.5. The Operator version number only indicates the version of the currently installed Operator. Because the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh Operator supports multiple versions of the Service Mesh control plane, the version of the Operator does not determine the version of your deployed ServiceMeshControlPlane resources.

    Upgrading to the latest Operator version automatically applies patch updates, but does not automatically upgrade your Service Mesh control plane to the latest minor version.

  • ServiceMeshControlPlane version - The ServiceMeshControlPlane version determines what version of Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh you are using. The value of the spec.version field in the ServiceMeshControlPlane resource controls the architecture and configuration settings that are used to install and deploy Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh. When you create the Service Mesh control plane you can set the version in one of two ways:

    • To configure in the Form View, select the version from the Control Plane Version menu.

    • To configure in the YAML View, set the value for spec.version in the YAML file.

Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) does not manage Service Mesh control plane upgrades, so the version number for your Operator and ServiceMeshControlPlane (SMCP) may not match, unless you have manually upgraded your SMCP.

Troubleshooting Operator installation

Validating Operator installation

When you install the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh Operators, OpenShift automatically creates the following objects as part of a successful Operator installation:

  • config maps

  • custom resource definitions

  • deployments

  • pods

  • replica sets

  • roles

  • role bindings

  • secrets

  • service accounts

  • services

From the OpenShift Dedicated console

You can verify that the Operator pods are available and running by using the OpenShift Dedicated console.

  1. Navigate to WorkloadsPods.

  2. Select the openshift-operators namespace.

  3. Verify that the following pods exist and have a status of running:

    • istio-operator

    • jaeger-operator

    • kiali-operator

  4. Select the openshift-operators-redhat namespace.

  5. Verify that the elasticsearch-operator pod exists and has a status of running.

From the command line
  1. Verify the Operator pods are available and running in the openshift-operators namespace with the following command:

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-operators
    Example output
    NAME                               READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    istio-operator-bb49787db-zgr87     1/1     Running   0          15s
    jaeger-operator-7d5c4f57d8-9xphf   1/1     Running   0          2m42s
    kiali-operator-f9c8d84f4-7xh2v     1/1     Running   0          64s
  2. Verify the Elasticsearch operator with the following command:

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-operators-redhat
    Example output
    NAME                                      READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    elasticsearch-operator-d4f59b968-796vq     1/1     Running   0          15s

Troubleshooting service mesh Operators

If you experience Operator issues:

  • Verify your Operator subscription status.

  • Verify that you did not install a community version of the Operator, instead of the supported Red Hat version.

  • Verify that you have the cluster-admin role to install Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh.

  • Check for any errors in the Operator pod logs if the issue is related to installation of Operators.

You can install Operators only through the OpenShift console, the OperatorHub is not accessible from the command line.

Viewing Operator pod logs

You can view Operator logs by using the oc logs command. Red Hat may request logs to help resolve support cases.

Procedure
  • To view Operator pod logs, enter the command:

    $ oc logs -n openshift-operators <podName>

    For example,

    $ oc logs -n openshift-operators istio-operator-bb49787db-zgr87

Troubleshooting the control plane

The Service Mesh control plane is composed of Istiod, which consolidates several previous control plane components (Citadel, Galley, Pilot) into a single binary. Deploying the ServiceMeshControlPlane also creates the other components that make up Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh as described in the architecture topic.

Validating the Service Mesh control plane installation

When you create the Service Mesh control plane, the Service Mesh Operator uses the parameters that you have specified in the ServiceMeshControlPlane resource file to do the following:

  • Creates the Istio components and deploys the following pods:

    • istiod

    • istio-ingressgateway

    • istio-egressgateway

    • grafana

    • prometheus

  • Calls the Kiali Operator to create Kaili deployment based on configuration in either the SMCP or the Kiali custom resource.

    You view the Kiali components under the Kiali Operator, not the Service Mesh Operator.

  • Calls the Red Hat OpenShift distributed tracing platform (Jaeger) Operator to create distributed tracing platform (Jaeger) components based on configuration in either the SMCP or the Jaeger custom resource.

    You view the Jaeger components under the Red Hat OpenShift distributed tracing platform (Jaeger) Operator and the Elasticsearch components under the Red Hat Elasticsearch Operator, not the Service Mesh Operator.

    From the OpenShift Dedicated console

    You can verify the Service Mesh control plane installation in the OpenShift Dedicated web console.

    1. Navigate to OperatorsInstalled Operators.

    2. Select the istio-system namespace.

    3. Select the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh Operator.

      1. Click the Istio Service Mesh Control Plane tab.

      2. Click the name of your control plane, for example basic.

      3. To view the resources created by the deployment, click the Resources tab. You can use the filter to narrow your view, for example, to check that all the Pods have a status of running.

      4. If the SMCP status indicates any problems, check the status: output in the YAML file for more information.

    4. Navigate back to OperatorsInstalled Operators.

    5. Select the OpenShift Elasticsearch Operator.

      1. Click the Elasticsearch tab.

      2. Click the name of the deployment, for example elasticsearch.

      3. To view the resources created by the deployment, click the Resources tab. .

      4. If the Status column any problems, check the status: output on the YAML tab for more information.

    6. Navigate back to OperatorsInstalled Operators.

    7. Select the Red Hat OpenShift distributed tracing platform (Jaeger) Operator.

      1. Click the Jaeger tab.

      2. Click the name of your deployment, for example jaeger.

      3. To view the resources created by the deployment, click the Resources tab.

      4. If the Status column indicates any problems, check the status: output on the YAML tab for more information.

    8. Navigate to OperatorsInstalled Operators.

    9. Select the Kiali Operator.

      1. Click the Istio Service Mesh Control Plane tab.

      2. Click the name of your deployment, for example kiali.

      3. To view the resources created by the deployment, click the Resources tab.

      4. If the Status column any problems, check the status: output on the YAML tab for more information.

From the command line
  1. Run the following command to see if the Service Mesh control plane pods are available and running, where istio-system is the namespace where you installed the SMCP.

    $ oc get pods -n istio-system
    Example output
    NAME                                   READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    grafana-6776785cfc-6fz7t               2/2     Running   0          102s
    istio-egressgateway-5f49dd99-l9ppq     1/1     Running   0          103s
    istio-ingressgateway-6dc885c48-jjd8r   1/1     Running   0          103s
    istiod-basic-6c9cc55998-wg4zq          1/1     Running   0          2m14s
    jaeger-6865d5d8bf-zrfss                2/2     Running   0          100s
    kiali-579799fbb7-8mwc8                 1/1     Running   0          46s
    prometheus-5c579dfb-6qhjk              2/2     Running   0          115s
  2. Check the status of the Service Mesh control plane deployment by using the following command. Replace istio-system with the namespace where you deployed the SMCP.

    $ oc get smcp -n istio-system

    The installation has finished successfully when the STATUS column is ComponentsReady.

    Example output
    NAME    READY   STATUS            PROFILES      VERSION   AGE
    basic   10/10   ComponentsReady   ["default"]   2.1.3     4m2s

    If you have modified and redeployed your Service Mesh control plane, the status should read UpdateSuccessful.

    Example output
    NAME            READY     STATUS             TEMPLATE   VERSION   AGE
    basic-install   10/10     UpdateSuccessful   default     v1.1     3d16h
  3. If the SMCP status indicates anything other than ComponentsReady check the status: output in the SCMP resource for more information.

    $ oc describe smcp <smcp-name> -n <controlplane-namespace>
    Example output
    $ oc describe smcp basic -n istio-system
  4. Check the status of the Jaeger deployment with the following command, where istio-system is the namespace where you deployed the SMCP.

    $ oc get jaeger -n istio-system
    Example output
    NAME     STATUS    VERSION   STRATEGY   STORAGE   AGE
    jaeger   Running   1.30.0    allinone   memory    15m
  5. Check the status of the Kiali deployment with the following command, where istio-system is the namespace where you deployed the SMCP.

    $ oc get kiali -n istio-system
    Example output
    NAME    AGE
    kiali   15m

Accessing the Kiali console

You can view your application’s topology, health, and metrics in the Kiali console. If your service is experiencing problems, the Kiali console lets you view the data flow through your service. You can view insights about the mesh components at different levels, including abstract applications, services, and workloads. Kiali also provides an interactive graph view of your namespace in real time.

To access the Kiali console you must have Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh installed, Kiali installed and configured.

The installation process creates a route to access the Kiali console.

If you know the URL for the Kiali console, you can access it directly. If you do not know the URL, use the following directions.

Procedure for administrators
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Dedicated web console with an administrator role.

  2. Click HomeProjects.

  3. On the Projects page, if necessary, use the filter to find the name of your project.

  4. Click the name of your project, for example, bookinfo.

  5. On the Project details page, in the Launcher section, click the Kiali link.

  6. Log in to the Kiali console with the same user name and password that you use to access the OpenShift Dedicated console.

    When you first log in to the Kiali Console, you see the Overview page which displays all the namespaces in your service mesh that you have permission to view.

    If you are validating the console installation and namespaces have not yet been added to the mesh, there might not be any data to display other than istio-system.

Procedure for developers
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Dedicated web console with a developer role.

  2. Click Project.

  3. On the Project Details page, if necessary, use the filter to find the name of your project.

  4. Click the name of your project, for example, bookinfo.

  5. On the Project page, in the Launcher section, click the Kiali link.

  6. Click Log In With OpenShift.

Accessing the Jaeger console

To access the Jaeger console you must have Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh installed, Red Hat OpenShift distributed tracing platform (Jaeger) installed and configured.

The installation process creates a route to access the Jaeger console.

If you know the URL for the Jaeger console, you can access it directly. If you do not know the URL, use the following directions.

Procedure from OpenShift console
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Dedicated web console as a user with cluster-admin rights. If you use Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated, you must have an account with the dedicated-admin role.

  2. Navigate to NetworkingRoutes.

  3. On the Routes page, select the Service Mesh control plane project, for example istio-system, from the Namespace menu.

    The Location column displays the linked address for each route.

  4. If necessary, use the filter to find the jaeger route. Click the route Location to launch the console.

  5. Click Log In With OpenShift.

Procedure from Kiali console
  1. Launch the Kiali console.

  2. Click Distributed Tracing in the left navigation pane.

  3. Click Log In With OpenShift.

Procedure from the CLI
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Dedicated CLI as a user with the cluster-admin role. If you use Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated, you must have an account with the dedicated-admin role.

    $ oc login --username=<NAMEOFUSER> https://<HOSTNAME>:6443
  2. To query for details of the route using the command line, enter the following command. In this example, istio-system is the Service Mesh control plane namespace.

    $ oc get route -n istio-system jaeger -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}'
  3. Launch a browser and navigate to https://<JAEGER_URL>, where <JAEGER_URL> is the route that you discovered in the previous step.

  4. Log in using the same user name and password that you use to access the OpenShift Dedicated console.

  5. If you have added services to the service mesh and have generated traces, you can use the filters and Find Traces button to search your trace data.

    If you are validating the console installation, there is no trace data to display.

Troubleshooting the Service Mesh control plane

If you are experiencing issues while deploying the Service Mesh control plane,

  • Ensure that the ServiceMeshControlPlane resource is installed in a project that is separate from your services and Operators. This documentation uses the istio-system project as an example, but you can deploy your control plane in any project as long as it is separate from the project that contains your Operators and services.

  • Ensure that the ServiceMeshControlPlane and Jaeger custom resources are deployed in the same project. For example, use the istio-system project for both.

Troubleshooting the data plane

The data plane is a set of intelligent proxies that intercept and control all inbound and outbound network communications between services in the service mesh.

Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh relies on a proxy sidecar within the application’s pod to provide service mesh capabilities to the application.

Troubleshooting sidecar injection

Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh does not automatically inject proxy sidecars to pods. You must opt in to sidecar injection.

Troubleshooting Istio sidecar injection

Check to see if automatic injection is enabled in the Deployment for your application. If automatic injection for the Envoy proxy is enabled, there should be a sidecar.istio.io/inject:"true" annotation in the Deployment resource under spec.template.metadata.annotations.

Troubleshooting Jaeger agent sidecar injection

Check to see if automatic injection is enabled in the Deployment for your application. If automatic injection for the Jaeger agent is enabled, there should be a sidecar.jaegertracing.io/inject:"true" annotation in the Deployment resource.

For more information about sidecar injection, see Enabling automatic injection

Troubleshooting Envoy proxy

The Envoy proxy intercepts all inbound and outbound traffic for all services in the service mesh. Envoy also collects and reports telemetry on the service mesh. Envoy is deployed as a sidecar to the relevant service in the same pod.

Enabling Envoy access logs

Envoy access logs are useful in diagnosing traffic failures and flows, and help with end-to-end traffic flow analysis.

To enable access logging for all istio-proxy containers, edit the ServiceMeshControlPlane (SMCP) object to add a file name for the logging output.

Procedure
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Container Platform CLI as a user with the cluster-admin role. Enter the following command. Then, enter your username and password when prompted.

    $ oc login --username=<NAMEOFUSER> https://<HOSTNAME>:6443
  2. Change to the project where you installed the Service Mesh control plane, for example istio-system.

    $ oc project istio-system
  3. Edit the ServiceMeshControlPlane file.

    $ oc edit smcp <smcp_name>
  4. As show in the following example, use name to specify the file name for the proxy log. If you do not specify a value for name, no log entries will be written.

    apiVersion: maistra.io/v2
    kind: ServiceMeshControlPlane
    metadata:
      name: basic
      namespace: istio-system
    spec:
      proxy:
        accessLogging:
          file:
            name: /dev/stdout     #file name

Getting support

If you experience difficulty with a procedure described in this documentation, or with OpenShift Dedicated in general, visit the Red Hat Customer Portal.

From the Customer Portal, you can:

  • Search or browse through the Red Hat Knowledgebase of articles and solutions relating to Red Hat products.

  • Submit a support case to Red Hat Support.

  • Access other product documentation.

To identify issues with your cluster, you can use Insights in OpenShift Cluster Manager. Insights provides details about issues and, if available, information on how to solve a problem.

If you have a suggestion for improving this documentation or have found an error, submit a Jira issue for the most relevant documentation component. Please provide specific details, such as the section name and OpenShift Dedicated version.

About the Red Hat Knowledgebase

The Red Hat Knowledgebase provides rich content aimed at helping you make the most of Red Hat’s products and technologies. The Red Hat Knowledgebase consists of articles, product documentation, and videos outlining best practices on installing, configuring, and using Red Hat products. In addition, you can search for solutions to known issues, each providing concise root cause descriptions and remedial steps.

Searching the Red Hat Knowledgebase

In the event of an OpenShift Dedicated issue, you can perform an initial search to determine if a solution already exists within the Red Hat Knowledgebase.

Prerequisites
  • You have a Red Hat Customer Portal account.

Procedure
  1. Log in to the Red Hat Customer Portal.

  2. Click Search.

  3. In the search field, input keywords and strings relating to the problem, including:

    • OpenShift Dedicated components (such as etcd)

    • Related procedure (such as installation)

    • Warnings, error messages, and other outputs related to explicit failures

  4. Click the Enter key.

  5. Optional: Select the OpenShift Dedicated product filter.

  6. Optional: Select the Documentation content type filter.

Submitting a support case

Prerequisites
  • You have access to the cluster as a user with the dedicated-admin role.

  • You have installed the OpenShift CLI (oc).

  • You have access to the Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager.

  • You have a Red Hat Customer Portal account.

Procedure
  1. Log in to the Customer Support page of the Red Hat Customer Portal.

  2. Click Get support.

  3. On the Cases tab of the Customer Support page:

    1. Optional: Change the pre-filled account and owner details if needed.

    2. Select the appropriate category for your issue, such as Bug or Defect, and click Continue.

  4. Enter the following information:

    1. In the Summary field, enter a concise but descriptive problem summary and further details about the symptoms being experienced, as well as your expectations.

    2. Select OpenShift Dedicated from the Product drop-down menu.

  5. Review the list of suggested Red Hat Knowledgebase solutions for a potential match against the problem that is being reported. If the suggested articles do not address the issue, click Continue.

  6. Review the updated list of suggested Red Hat Knowledgebase solutions for a potential match against the problem that is being reported. The list is refined as you provide more information during the case creation process. If the suggested articles do not address the issue, click Continue.

  7. Ensure that the account information presented is as expected, and if not, amend accordingly.

  8. Check that the autofilled OpenShift Dedicated Cluster ID is correct. If it is not, manually obtain your cluster ID.

    • To manually obtain your cluster ID using OpenShift Cluster Manager:

      1. Navigate to Clusters.

      2. Click on the name of the cluster you need to open a support case for.

      3. Find the value in the Cluster ID field of the Details section of the Overview tab.

  9. Complete the following questions where prompted and then click Continue:

    • What are you experiencing? What are you expecting to happen?

    • Define the value or impact to you or the business.

    • Where are you experiencing this behavior? What environment?

    • When does this behavior occur? Frequency? Repeatedly? At certain times?

  10. Upload relevant diagnostic data files and click Continue.

  11. Input relevant case management details and click Continue.

  12. Preview the case details and click Submit.