Overview

As an alternative to performing an automated upgrade, you can manually upgrade your OpenShift cluster. To manually upgrade without disruption, it is important to upgrade each component as documented in this topic.

Before you begin your upgrade, familiarize yourself now with the entire procedure. Specific releases may require additional steps to be performed at key points before or during the standard upgrade process.

Preparing for a Manual Upgrade

  1. If you are upgrading from OpenShift Enterprise 3.0 to 3.1, perform the following steps:

    1. On each master and node host, manually disable the 3.0 channel and enable the 3.1 channel:

      # subscription-manager repos --disable="rhel-7-server-ose-3.0-rpms" \
          --enable="rhel-7-server-ose-3.1-rpms"
    2. Create an etcd backup on each master:

      # yum install etcd
      # etcdctl backup --data-dir /var/lib/openshift/openshift.local.etcd \
          --backup-dir /var/lib/openshift/openshift.local.etcd.bak
    3. Remove support for the v1beta3 API. Update the /etc/openshift/master/master-config.yml file on each master, and remove v1beta3 from the apiLevels and kubernetesMasterConfig.apiLevels parameters.

    4. During this upgrade, some directories are renamed from openshift to origin, so create the following symlinks on each host:

      # ln -s /var/lib/openshift /var/lib/origin
      # ln -s /etc/openshift /etc/origin
  2. Install or update to the following latest available *-excluder packages on each RHEL 7 system, which helps ensure your systems stay on the correct versions of atomic-openshift and docker packages when you are not trying to upgrade, according to the OpenShift Enterprise version:

    # yum install atomic-openshift-excluder atomic-openshift-docker-excluder

    These packages add entries to the exclude directive in the host’s /etc/yum.conf file.

  3. If you are already running OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 or later, create an etcd backup by running:

    # yum install etcd
    # etcdctl backup --data-dir /var/lib/origin/openshift.local.etcd \
        --backup-dir /var/lib/origin/openshift.local.etcd.bak
  4. For any upgrade path, always ensure that you are running the latest kernel:

    # yum update kernel

Upgrading Masters

Upgrade your master hosts first:

  1. Run the following command on each master to remove the atomic-openshift packages from the list of yum excludes on the host:

    # atomic-openshift-excluder unexclude
  2. Upgrade the atomic-openshift packages or related images.

    # yum upgrade atomic-openshift-master
  3. If you are upgrading from OpenShift Enterprise 3.0 to 3.1:

    1. Create the following master proxy client certificates:

      # cd /etc/origin/master/
      # oadm ca create-master-certs --cert-dir=/etc/origin/master/ \
                  --master=https://<internal-master-fqdn>:8443 \
                  --public-master=https://<external-master-fqdn>:8443 \
                  --hostnames=<external-master-fqdn>,<internal-master-fqdn>,localhost,127.0.0.1,<master-ip-address>,kubernetes.default.local \
                  --overwrite=false

      This creates files at /etc/origin/master/master.proxy-client.{crt,key}.

    2. Then, add the master proxy client certificates to the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yml file on each master:

      kubernetesMasterConfig:
        proxyClientInfo:
          certFile: master.proxy-client.crt
          keyFile: master.proxy-client.key
    3. Enable the following renamed service on master hosts:

      # systemctl enable atomic-openshift-master
  4. For any upgrade path, now restart the atomic-openshift-master service and review its logs to ensure services have been restarted successfully:

    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master
    # journalctl -r -u atomic-openshift-master
  5. Run the following command on each master to add the atomic-openshift packages back to the list of yum excludes on the host:

    # atomic-openshift-excluder exclude

Updating Policy Definitions

After a cluster upgrade, the recommended default cluster roles may have been updated. To check if an update is recommended for your environment, you can run:

# oadm policy reconcile-cluster-roles

This command outputs a list of roles that are out of date and their new proposed values. For example:

# oadm policy reconcile-cluster-roles
apiVersion: v1
items:
- apiVersion: v1
  kind: ClusterRole
  metadata:
    creationTimestamp: null
    name: admin
  rules:
  - attributeRestrictions: null
    resources:
    - builds/custom
...

Your output will vary based on the OpenShift version and any local customizations you have made. Review the proposed policy carefully.

You can either modify this output to re-apply any local policy changes you have made, or you can automatically apply the new policy using the following process:

  1. Reconcile the cluster roles:

    # oadm policy reconcile-cluster-roles --confirm
  2. Restart the master service:

    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master
  3. Reconcile security context constraints:

    # oadm policy reconcile-sccs \
        --additive-only=true \
        --confirm

Upgrading Nodes

After upgrading your masters, you can upgrade your nodes. When restarting the atomic-openshift-node service, there will be a brief disruption of outbound network connectivity from running pods to services while the service proxy is restarted. The length of this disruption should be very short and scales based on the number of services in the entire cluster.

To upgrade nodes:

  1. Run the following command on each node to remove the atomic-openshift packages from the list of yum excludes on the host:

    # atomic-openshift-excluder unexclude
  2. As a user with cluster-admin privileges, disable scheduling for the node:

    # oadm manage-node <node> --schedulable=false
  3. On each node host, upgrade all atomic-openshift packages:

    # yum upgrade atomic-openshift\*
  4. If you are upgrading from OpenShift Enterprise 3.0 to 3.1, enable the following renamed service on node hosts:

    # systemctl enable atomic-openshift-node
  5. For any upgrade path, now restart the atomic-openshift-node service:

    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-node
  6. Enable scheduling again for any non-master nodes that you disabled:

    # oadm manage-node <node> --schedulable=true
  7. Run the following command on the node to add the atomic-openshift packages back to the list of yum excludes on the host:

    # atomic-openshift-excluder exclude
  8. Repeat these steps on the next node, and continue repeating these steps until all nodes have been upgraded.

  9. After all nodes have been upgraded, as a user with cluster-admin privileges, verify that all nodes are showing as Ready:

    # oc get nodes
    NAME                    LABELS                                        STATUS
    master.example.com      kubernetes.io/hostname=master.example.com     Ready,SchedulingDisabled
    node1.example.com       kubernetes.io/hostname=node1.example.com      Ready
    node2.example.com       kubernetes.io/hostname=node2.example.com      Ready

Upgrading the Router

If you have previously deployed a router, the router deployment configuration must be upgraded to apply updates contained in the router image. To upgrade your router without disrupting services, you must have previously deployed a highly-available routing service.

Edit your router’s deployment configuration. For example, if it has the default router name:

# oc edit dc/router

Apply the following changes:

...
spec:
 template:
    spec:
      containers:
      - env:
        ...
        image: registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/ose-haproxy-router:v3.1.1.11 (1)
        imagePullPolicy: IfNotPresent
        ...
1 Adjust the image version to match the version you are upgrading to.

You should see one router pod updated and then the next.

Upgrading the Registry

The registry must also be upgraded for changes to take effect in the registry image. If you have used a PersistentVolumeClaim or a host mount point, you may restart the registry without losing the contents of your registry. Deploying a Docker Registry details how to configure persistent storage for the registry.

Edit your registry’s deployment configuration:

# oc edit dc/docker-registry

Apply the following changes:

...
spec:
 template:
    spec:
      containers:
      - env:
        ...
        image: registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/ose-docker-registry:v3.1.1.11 (1)
        imagePullPolicy: IfNotPresent
        ...
1 Adjust the image version to match the version you are upgrading to.

Images that are being pushed or pulled from the internal registry at the time of upgrade will fail and should be restarted automatically. This will not disrupt pods that are already running.

Updating the Default Image Streams and Templates

By default, the quick and advanced installation methods automatically create default image streams, InstantApp templates, and database service templates in the openshift project, which is a default project to which all users have view access. These objects were created during installation from the JSON files located under the /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/ directory.

Because RHEL Atomic Host 7 cannot use yum to update packages, the following steps must take place on a RHEL 7 system.

  1. Update the packages that provide the example JSON files. On a subscribed Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 system where you can run the CLI as a user with cluster-admin permissions, install or update to the latest version of the atomic-openshift-utils package, which should also update the openshift-ansible- packages:

    # yum update atomic-openshift-utils

    The openshift-ansible-roles package provides the latest example JSON files.

  2. Update the global openshift project by running the following commands. Receiving warnings about items that already exist is expected.

    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json
    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/db-templates
    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/quickstart-templates
    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/xpaas-streams
    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/xpaas-templates
    # oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json
    # oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/db-templates
    # oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/quickstart-templates
    # oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/xpaas-streams
    # oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/openshift/examples/xpaas-templates
  3. After a manual upgrade, get the latest templates from openshift-ansible-roles:

    rpm -ql openshift-ansible-roles | grep examples | grep v1.2

    In this example, /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json is the latest file that you want in the latest openshift-ansible-roles package.

    /usr/share/openshift/examples/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json is not owned by a package, but is updated by Ansible. If you are upgrading outside of Ansible. you need to get the latest .json files on the system where you are running oc, which can run anywhere that has access to the master.

  4. Install atomic-openshift-utils and its dependencies to install the new content into /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/.:

    $ oc create -n openshift -f  /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f  /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/image-streams/image-streams-rhel7.json
  5. Update the templates:

    $ oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/
    $ oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/db-templates/
    $ oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/infrastructure-templates/
    $ oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/xpaas-templates/
    $ oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/xpaas-streams/
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/db-templates/
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/infrastructure-templates/
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/xpaas-templates/
    $ oc replace -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/xpaas-streams/

    Errors are generated for items that already exist. This is expected behavior:

    # oc create -n openshift -f /usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/
    Error from server: error when creating "/usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/cakephp-mysql.json": templates "cakephp-mysql-example" already exists
    Error from server: error when creating "/usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/cakephp.json": templates "cakephp-example" already exists
    Error from server: error when creating "/usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/dancer-mysql.json": templates "dancer-mysql-example" already exists
    Error from server: error when creating "/usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/dancer.json": templates "dancer-example" already exists
    Error from server: error when creating "/usr/share/ansible/openshift-ansible/roles/openshift_examples/files/examples/v1.2/quickstart-templates/django-postgresql.json": templates "django-psql-example" already exists

Now, content can be updated. Without running the automated upgrade playbooks, the content is not updated in /usr/share/openshift/.

Importing the Latest Images

After updating the default image streams, you may also want to ensure that the images within those streams are updated. For each image stream in the default openshift project, you can run:

# oc import-image -n openshift <imagestream>

For example, get the list of all image streams in the default openshift project:

# oc get is -n openshift
NAME     DOCKER REPO                                                      TAGS                   UPDATED
mongodb  registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/mongodb-24-rhel7           2.4,latest,v3.1    16 hours ago
mysql    registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/mysql-55-rhel7             5.5,latest,v3.1    16 hours ago
nodejs   registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/nodejs-010-rhel7           0.10,latest,v3.1   16 hours ago
...

Update each image stream one at a time:

# oc import-image -n openshift nodejs
Waiting for the import to complete, CTRL+C to stop waiting.
The import completed successfully.

Name:                   nodejs
Created:                16 hours ago
Labels:                 <none>
Annotations:            openshift.io/image.dockerRepositoryCheck=2015-07-21T13:17:00Z
Docker Pull Spec:       registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/nodejs-010-rhel7

Tag             Spec            Created         PullSpec                                                        Image
0.10            latest          16 hours ago    registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/nodejs-010-rhel7:latest   66d92cebc0e48e4e4be3a93d0f9bd54f21af7928ceaa384d20800f6e6fcf669f
latest                          16 hours ago    registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/nodejs-010-rhel7:latest   66d92cebc0e48e4e4be3a93d0f9bd54f21af7928ceaa384d20800f6e6fcf669f
v3.1            <pushed>        16 hours ago    registry.access.redhat.com/openshift3/nodejs-010-rhel7:v3.1     66d92cebc0e48e4e4be3a93d0f9bd54f21af7928ceaa384d20800f6e6fcf669f

In order to update your S2I-based applications, you must manually trigger a new build of those applications after importing the new images using oc start-build <app-name>.

Updating Master and Node Certificates

The following steps may be required for any OpenShift cluster that was originally installed prior to the OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 release. This may include any and all updates from that version.

Node Certificates

With the 3.1 release, certificates for each of the kubelet nodes were updated to include the IP address of the node. Any node certificates generated before the 3.1 release may not contain the IP address of the node.

If a node is missing the IP address as part of its certificate, clients may refuse to connect to the kubelet endpoint. Usually this will result in errors regarding the certificate not containing an IP SAN.

In order to remedy this situation, you may need to manually update the certificates for your node.

Checking the Node’s Certificate

The following command can be used to determine which Subject Alternative Names (SANs) are present in the node’s serving certificate. In this example, the Subject Alternative Names are mynode, mynode.mydomain.com, and 1.2.3.4:

# openssl x509 -in /etc/origin/node/server.crt -text -noout | grep -A 1 "Subject Alternative Name"
X509v3 Subject Alternative Name:
DNS:mynode, DNS:mynode.mydomain.com, IP: 1.2.3.4

Ensure that the nodeIP value set in the /etc/origin/node/node-config.yaml file is present in the IP values from the Subject Alternative Names listed in the node’s serving certificate. If the nodeIP is not present, then it will need to be added to the node’s certificate.

If the nodeIP value is already contained within the Subject Alternative Names, then no further steps are required.

You will need to know the Subject Alternative Names and nodeIP value for the following steps.

Generating a New Node Certificate

If your current node certificate does not contain the proper IP address, then you must regenerate a new certificate for your node.

Node certificates will be regenerated on the master (or first master) and are then copied into place on node systems.

  1. Create a temporary directory in which to perform the following steps:

    # mkdir /tmp/node_certificate_update
    # cd /tmp/node_certificate_update
  2. Export the signing options:

    # export signing_opts="--signer-cert=/etc/origin/master/ca.crt \
        --signer-key=/etc/origin/master/ca.key \
        --signer-serial=/etc/origin/master/ca.serial.txt"
  3. Generate the new certificate:

    # oadm ca create-server-cert --cert=server.crt \
      --key=server.key $signing_opts \
      --hostnames=<existing_SANs>,<nodeIP>

    For example, if the Subject Alternative Names from before were mynode, mynode.mydomain.com, and 1.2.3.4, and the nodeIP was 10.10.10.1, then you would need to run the following command:

    # oadm ca create-server-cert --cert=server.crt \
      --key=server.key $signing_opts \
      --hostnames=mynode,mynode.mydomain.com,1.2.3.4,10.10.10.1

Replace Node Serving Certificates

Back up the existing /etc/origin/node/server.crt and /etc/origin/node/server.key files for your node:

# mv /etc/origin/node/server.crt /etc/origin/node/server.crt.bak
# mv /etc/origin/node/server.key /etc/origin/node/server.key.bak

You must now copy the new server.crt and server.key created in the temporary directory during the previous step:

# mv /tmp/node_certificate_update/server.crt /etc/origin/node/server.crt
# mv /tmp/node_certificate_update/server.key /etc/origin/node/server.key

After you have replaced the node’s certificate, restart the node service:

# systemctl restart atomic-openshift-node

Master Certificates

With the 3.1 release, certificates for each of the masters were updated to include all names that pods may use to communicate with masters. Any master certificates generated before the 3.1 release may not contain these additional service names.

Checking the Master’s Certificate

The following command can be used to determine which Subject Alternative Names (SANs) are present in the master’s serving certificate. In this example, the Subject Alternative Names are mymaster, mymaster.mydomain.com, and 1.2.3.4:

# openssl x509 -in /etc/origin/master/master.server.crt -text -noout | grep -A 1 "Subject Alternative Name"
X509v3 Subject Alternative Name:
DNS:mymaster, DNS:mymaster.mydomain.com, IP: 1.2.3.4

Ensure that the following entries are present in the Subject Alternative Names for the master’s serving certificate:

Entry Example

Kubernetes service IP address

172.30.0.1

All master host names

master1.example.com

All master IP addresses

192.168.122.1

Public master host name in clustered environments

public-master.example.com

kubernetes

kubernetes.default

kubernetes.default.svc

kubernetes.default.svc.cluster.local

openshift

openshift.default

openshift.default.svc

openshift.default.svc.cluster.local

If these names are already contained within the Subject Alternative Names, then no further steps are required.

Generating a New Master Certificate

If your current master certificate does not contain all names from the list above, then you must generate a new certificate for your master:

  1. Back up the existing /etc/origin/master/master.server.crt and /etc/origin/master/master.server.key files for your master:

    # mv /etc/origin/master/master.server.crt /etc/origin/master/master.server.crt.bak
    # mv /etc/origin/master/master.server.key /etc/origin/master/master.server.key.bak
  2. Export the service names. These names will be used when generating the new certificate:

    # export service_names="kubernetes,kubernetes.default,kubernetes.default.svc,kubernetes.default.svc.cluster.local,openshift,openshift.default,openshift.default.svc,openshift.default.svc.cluster.local"
  3. You will need the first IP in the services subnet (the kubernetes service IP) as well as the values of masterIP, masterURL and publicMasterURL contained in the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yaml file for the following steps.

    The kubernetes service IP can be obtained with:

    # oc get svc/kubernetes --template='{{.spec.clusterIP}}'
  4. Generate the new certificate:

    # oadm ca create-master-certs \
          --hostnames=<master_hostnames>,<master_IP_addresses>,<kubernetes_service_IP>,$service_names \ (1) (2) (3)
          --master=<internal_master_address> \ (4)
          --public-master=<public_master_address> \ (5)
          --cert-dir=/etc/origin/master/ \
          --overwrite=false
    1 Adjust <master_hostnames> to match your master host name. In a clustered environment, add all master host names.
    2 Adjust <master_IP_addresses> to match the value of masterIP. In a clustered environment, add all master IP addresses.
    3 Adjust <kubernetes_service_IP> to the first IP in the kubernetes services subnet.
    4 Adjust <internal_master_address> to match the value of masterURL.
    5 Adjust <public_master_address> to match the value of masterPublicURL.
  5. Restart master services. For single master deployments:

    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master

    For native HA multiple master deployments:

    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master-api
    # systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master-controllers

    For Pacemaker HA multiple master deployments:

    # pcs resource restart master

    After the service restarts, the certificate update is complete.

Upgrading the EFK Logging Stack

If you have previously deployed the EFK logging stack and want to upgrade to the latest logging component images, you must take the following steps to safely upgrade with minimal disruption to your log data.

The following steps apply when you want to update to newer OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 logging images, but are not yet fully upgrading your cluster to a later minor or major release of OpenShift Enterprise. The IMAGE_VERSION variable is used in a later step to ensure that you do not accidentally pull the wrong images.

  1. Ensure you are working in the project where the EFK stack was previously deployed, and stay in that project for the remainder of these steps. For example, if the project is named logging:

    $ oc project logging
  2. Scale down your Fluentd instances to 0:

    $ oc scale dc/logging-fluentd --replicas=0

    Wait until they have properly terminated. This helps prevent loss of data by giving them time to properly flush their current buffer and send any logs they were processing to Elasticsearch.

  3. Scale down your Kibana instances:

    $ oc scale dc/logging-kibana --replicas=0

    If you have an operations deployment, also run:

    $ oc scale dc/logging-kibana-ops --replicas=0
  4. Once your Fluentd and Kibana pods are confirmed to be terminated, you can safely scale down the Elasticsearch pods:

    $ oc scale dc/logging-es-<unique_name> --replicas=0

    If you have an operations deployment, also run:

    $ oc scale dc/logging-es-ops-<unique_name> --replicas=0
  5. After your Elasticsearch pods are confirmed to be terminated, pull in the latest EFK images using the same procedure described in Importing the Latest Images, replacing the openshift project with the project where the EFK stack was previously deployed.

    For example, if the project is named logging:

    $ oc import-image -n logging <imagestream>

    The list of image streams are:

    logging-auth-proxy
    logging-elasticsearch
    logging-fluentd
    logging-kibana
  6. With the latest images in your repository, you can now rerun the deployer to generate any missing or changed features.

    1. First, ensure that your OAuth client has been deleted:

      $ oc delete oauthclient --selector logging-infra=support
    2. Then, proceed to follow the same steps as done previously in Deploying the EFK Stack, but ensure that you add IMAGE_VERSION to the list of variables and set it to the appropriate version. For example, for the latest 3.1.1 image:

      $ oc process logging-deployer-template -n openshift \
                 -v IMAGE_VERSION=3.1.1,KIBANA_HOSTNAME=kibana.example.com,ES_CLUSTER_SIZE=1,PUBLIC_MASTER_URL=https://localhost:8443 \
                 | oc create -f -

      See Deploying the EFK Stack for the full instructions. After the deployer completes, re-attach your persistent volumes you were using previously.

  7. Next, scale Elasticsearch back up incrementally so that the cluster has time to rebuild.

    1. To begin, scale up to 1:

      $ oc scale dc/logging-es-<unique_name> --replicas=1

      Follow the logs of the resulting pod to ensure that it is able to recover its indices correctly and that there are no errors:

      $ oc logs -f <pod_name>

      If that is successful, you can then do the same for the operations cluster, if one was previously used.

    2. After all Elasticsearch nodes have recovered their indices, continue to scale it back up to the size it was prior to doing maintenance. Check the logs of the Elasticsearch members to verify that they have correctly joined the cluster and recovered.

  8. Now scale Kibana and Fluentd back up to their previous state. Because Fluentd was shut down and allowed to push its remaining records to Elasticsearch in the previous steps, it can now pick back up from where it left off with no loss of logs, provided any unread log files are still available on the node.

  9. In the latest version, Kibana will display indices differently now in order to prevent users from being able to access the logs of previously created projects that have been deleted.

    Due to this change, your old logs will not appear automatically. To migrate your old indices to the new format, rerun the deployer with -v MODE=migrate in addition to your prior flags. This should be run while your Elasticsearch cluster is running, as the script must connect to it to make changes.

    This only impacts non-operations logs. Operations logs will appear the same as in previous versions. There should be minimal performance impact to Elasticsearch while running this and it will not perform an install.

Additional Manual Steps Per Release

Some OpenShift releases may have additional instructions specific to that release that must be performed to fully apply the updates across the cluster. Read through the following sections carefully depending on your upgrade path, as you may be required to perform certain steps at key points during the standard upgrade process described earlier in this topic.

See the OpenShift Enterprise 3.1 Release Notes to review the latest release notes.

OpenShift Enterprise 3.1.0

There are no additional manual steps for these releases that are not already mentioned inline during the standard manual upgrade process.

OpenShift Enterprise 3.1.1

There was an issue with OpenShift Enterprise 3.1.1 where hosts with host names that resolved to IP addresses that were not local to the host would run into problems with liveness and readiness probes on newly-created HAProxy routers. This was resolved in RHBA-2016:0293 by configuring the probes to use localhost as the hostname for pods with hostPort values.

If you created a router under the affected version, and your liveness or readiness probes unexpectedly fail for your router, then add host: localhost:

# oc edit dc/router

Apply the following changes:

spec:
 template:
    spec:
      containers:
      ...
        livenessProbe:
          httpGet:
            host: localhost (1)
            path: /healthz
            port: 1936
            scheme: HTTP
          initialDelaySeconds: 10
          timeoutSeconds: 1
        ...
        readinessProbe:
          httpGet:
            host: localhost (2)
            path: /healthz
            port: 1936
            scheme: HTTP
          timeoutSeconds: 1
1 Add 'host: localhost' to your liveness probe.
2 Add 'host: localhost' to your readiness probe.

OpenShift Enterprise 3.1.1.11

There are no additional manual steps for the upgrade to OpenShift Enterprise 3.1.1.11 that are not already mentioned inline during the standard manual upgrade process.

Verifying the Upgrade

To verify the upgrade, first check that all nodes are marked as Ready:

# oc get nodes
NAME                 LABELS                                                                STATUS
master.example.com   kubernetes.io/hostname=master.example.com,region=infra,zone=default   Ready
node1.example.com    kubernetes.io/hostname=node1.example.com,region=primary,zone=east     Ready

Then, verify that you are running the expected versions of the docker-registry and router images, if deployed:

# oc get -n default dc/docker-registry -o json | grep \"image\"
    "image": "openshift3/ose-docker-registry:v3.1.1.11",
# oc get -n default dc/router -o json | grep \"image\"
    "image": "openshift3/ose-haproxy-router:v3.1.1.11",

If you upgraded from OSE 3.0 to OSE 3.1, verify in your old /etc/sysconfig/openshift-master and /etc/sysconfig/openshift-node files that any custom configuration is added to your new /etc/sysconfig/atomic-openshift-master and /etc/sysconfig/atomic-openshift-node files.

After upgrading, you can use the experimental diagnostics tool to look for common issues:

# openshift ex diagnostics
...
[Note] Summary of diagnostics execution:
[Note] Completed with no errors or warnings seen.