Welcome to the Azure Red Hat OpenShift 4 documentation, where you can find information to help you learn about Azure Red Hat OpenShift and start exploring its features.

To navigate the Azure Red Hat OpenShift 4 documentation, you can either

  • Use the left navigation bar to browse the documentation or

  • Select the activity that interests you from the contents of this Welcome page

Azure Red Hat OpenShift is supported by Red Hat and Microsoft. Use the following table to navigate all the available documentation related to Azure Red Hat OpenShift.

Documentation unique to the Azure Red Hat OpenShift service (e.g. how to create a cluster, how to get support) is generally found on the Microsoft Azure documentation site; documentation that is common to all OpenShift distributions is generally found on this page.

Microsoft Azure documentation Red Hat OpenShift documentation
  • Overview of Azure Red Hat OpenShift

  • Creating a cluster

  • Getting support

  • How-to guides and tutorials

  • Azure CLI reference

  • Overview of OpenShift architecture

  • Release Notes

  • Developing on OpenShift

  • Managing your cluster

Available Regions

Azure Red Hat OpenShift is currently available in the following regions:

  • East US (Public/United States)

  • East US 2 (Public/United States)

  • South Central US (Public/United States)

  • North Europe (Public/Europe)

  • West Europe (Public/Europe)

  • Southeast Asia (Public/Asia Pacific)

  • Australia East (Public/Australia)

  • UK South (Public/United Kingdom)

  • West US 2 (Public/United States)

Developer activities

Ultimately, Azure Red Hat OpenShift is a platform for developing and deploying containerized applications. As an application developer, Azure Red Hat OpenShift documentation will help you:

  • Understand Azure Red Hat OpenShift development: Learn the different types of containerized applications, from simple containers to advanced Kubernetes deployments and Operators.

  • Work with projects: Create projects from the web console or CLI to organize and share the software you develop.

  • Work with applications: Use the Developer perspective in the Azure Red Hat OpenShift web console to easily create and deploy applications. Use the Topology view to visually interact with your applications, monitor status, connect and group components, and modify your code base.

  • Use the developer CLI tool (odo): The odo CLI tool lets developers create single or multi-component applications easily and automates deployment, build, and service route configurations. It abstracts complex Kubernetes and Azure Red Hat OpenShift concepts, allowing developers to focus on developing their applications.

  • Understand Operators: Operators are the preferred method for creating on-cluster applications for Azure Red Hat OpenShift 4. Learn about the Operator Framework and how to deploy applications using installed Operators into your projects.

  • Understand image builds: Choose from different build strategies (Docker, S2I, custom, and pipeline) that can include different kinds of source materials (from places like Git repositories, local binary inputs, and external artifacts). Then, follow examples of build types from basic builds to advanced builds.

  • Create container images: A container image is the most basic building block in Azure Red Hat OpenShift (and Kubernetes) applications. Defining imagestreams lets you gather multiple versions of an image in one place as you continue its development. S2I containers let you insert your source code into a base container that is set up to run code of a particular type (such as Ruby, Node.js, or Python).

  • Create Deployments and DeploymentConfigs: Use Deployments and DeploymentConfigs to exert fine-grained management over applications. Use the Workloads page or oc CLI to manage DeploymentConfigs. Learn Rolling, Recreate, and Custom deployment strategies.

  • Create templates: Use existing templates or create your own templates that describe how an application is built or deployed. A template can combine images with descriptions, parameters, replicas, exposed ports and other content that defines how an application can be run or built.