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Creating a performance profile

Learn about the Performance Profile Creator (PPC) and how you can use it to create a performance profile.

About the Performance Profile Creator

The Performance Profile Creator (PPC) is a command-line tool, delivered with the Node Tuning Operator, used to create the performance profile. The tool consumes must-gather data from the cluster and several user-supplied profile arguments. The PPC generates a performance profile that is appropriate for your hardware and topology.

The tool is run by one of the following methods:

  • Invoking podman

  • Calling a wrapper script

Gathering data about your cluster using the must-gather command

The Performance Profile Creator (PPC) tool requires must-gather data. As a cluster administrator, run the must-gather command to capture information about your cluster.

Prerequisites
  • Access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.

  • The OpenShift CLI (oc) installed.

Procedure
  1. Optional: Verify that a matching machine config pool exists with a label:

    $ oc describe mcp/worker-rt
    Example output
    Name:         worker-rt
    Namespace:
    Labels:       machineconfiguration.openshift.io/role=worker-rt
  2. If a matching label does not exist add a label for a machine config pool (MCP) that matches with the MCP name:

    $ oc label mcp <mcp_name> machineconfiguration.openshift.io/role=<mcp_name>
  3. Navigate to the directory where you want to store the must-gather data.

  4. Collect cluster information by running the following command:

    $ oc adm must-gather
  5. Optional: Create a compressed file from the must-gather directory:

    $ tar cvaf must-gather.tar.gz must-gather/

    Compressed output is required if you are running the Performance Profile Creator wrapper script.

Running the Performance Profile Creator using Podman

As a cluster administrator, you can run podman and the Performance Profile Creator to create a performance profile.

Prerequisites
  • Access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.

  • A cluster installed on bare-metal hardware.

  • A node with podman and OpenShift CLI (oc) installed.

  • Access to the Node Tuning Operator image.

Procedure
  1. Check the machine config pool:

    $ oc get mcp
    Example output
    NAME         CONFIG                                                 UPDATED   UPDATING   DEGRADED   MACHINECOUNT   READYMACHINECOUNT   UPDATEDMACHINECOUNT   DEGRADEDMACHINECOUNT   AGE
    master       rendered-master-acd1358917e9f98cbdb599aea622d78b       True      False      False      3              3                   3                     0                      22h
    worker-cnf   rendered-worker-cnf-1d871ac76e1951d32b2fe92369879826   False     True       False      2              1                   1                     0                      22h
  2. Use Podman to authenticate to registry.redhat.io:

    $ podman login registry.redhat.io
    Username: <username>
    Password: <password>
  3. Optional: Display help for the PPC tool:

    $ podman run --rm --entrypoint performance-profile-creator registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14 -h
    Example output
    A tool that automates creation of Performance Profiles
    
    Usage:
      performance-profile-creator [flags]
    
    Flags:
          --disable-ht                        Disable Hyperthreading
      -h, --help                              help for performance-profile-creator
          --info string                       Show cluster information; requires --must-gather-dir-path, ignore the other arguments. [Valid values: log, json] (default "log")
          --mcp-name string                   MCP name corresponding to the target machines (required)
          --must-gather-dir-path string       Must gather directory path (default "must-gather")
          --offlined-cpu-count int            Number of offlined CPUs
          --per-pod-power-management          Enable Per Pod Power Management
          --power-consumption-mode string     The power consumption mode.  [Valid values: default, low-latency, ultra-low-latency] (default "default")
          --profile-name string               Name of the performance profile to be created (default "performance")
          --reserved-cpu-count int            Number of reserved CPUs (required)
          --rt-kernel                         Enable Real Time Kernel (required)
          --split-reserved-cpus-across-numa   Split the Reserved CPUs across NUMA nodes
          --topology-manager-policy string    Kubelet Topology Manager Policy of the performance profile to be created. [Valid values: single-numa-node, best-effort, restricted] (default "restricted")
          --user-level-networking             Run with User level Networking(DPDK) enabled
  4. Run the Performance Profile Creator tool in discovery mode:

    Discovery mode inspects your cluster by using the output from must-gather. The output produced includes information on the following conditions:

    • The NUMA cell partitioning with the allocated CPU ids

    • Whether Hyper-Threading is enabled

    Using this information you can set appropriate values for some of the arguments supplied to the Performance Profile Creator tool.

    $ podman run --entrypoint performance-profile-creator -v <path_to_must-gather>/must-gather:/must-gather:z registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14 --info log --must-gather-dir-path /must-gather

    This command uses the performance profile creator as a new entry point to podman. It maps the must-gather data for the host into the container image and invokes the required user-supplied profile arguments to produce the my-performance-profile.yaml file.

    The -v option can be the path to either of the following components:

    • The must-gather output directory

    • An existing directory containing the must-gather decompressed .tar file

    The info option requires a value which specifies the output format. Possible values are log and JSON. The JSON format is reserved for debugging.

  5. Run podman:

    $ podman run --entrypoint performance-profile-creator -v /must-gather:/must-gather:z registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14 --mcp-name=worker-cnf --reserved-cpu-count=4 --rt-kernel=true --split-reserved-cpus-across-numa=false --must-gather-dir-path /must-gather --power-consumption-mode=ultra-low-latency --offlined-cpu-count=6 > my-performance-profile.yaml

    The Performance Profile Creator arguments are shown in the Performance Profile Creator arguments table. The following arguments are required:

    • reserved-cpu-count

    • mcp-name

    • rt-kernel

    The mcp-name argument in this example is set to worker-cnf based on the output of the command oc get mcp. For single-node OpenShift use --mcp-name=master.

  6. Review the created YAML file:

    $ cat my-performance-profile.yaml
    Example output
    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: performance
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 2-39,48-79
        offlined: 42-47
        reserved: 0-1,40-41
      machineConfigPoolSelector:
        machineconfiguration.openshift.io/role: worker-cnf
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
      numa:
        topologyPolicy: restricted
      realTimeKernel:
        enabled: true
      workloadHints:
        highPowerConsumption: true
        realTime: true
  7. Apply the generated profile:

    $ oc apply -f my-performance-profile.yaml
Additional resources

How to run podman to create a performance profile

The following example illustrates how to run podman to create a performance profile with 20 reserved CPUs that are to be split across the NUMA nodes.

Node hardware configuration:

  • 80 CPUs

  • Hyperthreading enabled

  • Two NUMA nodes

  • Even numbered CPUs run on NUMA node 0 and odd numbered CPUs run on NUMA node 1

Run podman to create the performance profile:

$ podman run --entrypoint performance-profile-creator -v /must-gather:/must-gather:z registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14 --mcp-name=worker-cnf --reserved-cpu-count=20 --rt-kernel=true --split-reserved-cpus-across-numa=true --must-gather-dir-path /must-gather > my-performance-profile.yaml

The created profile is described in the following YAML:

  apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
  kind: PerformanceProfile
  metadata:
    name: performance
  spec:
    cpu:
      isolated: 10-39,50-79
      reserved: 0-9,40-49
    nodeSelector:
      node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
    numa:
      topologyPolicy: restricted
    realTimeKernel:
      enabled: true

In this case, 10 CPUs are reserved on NUMA node 0 and 10 are reserved on NUMA node 1.

Running the Performance Profile Creator wrapper script

The performance profile wrapper script simplifies the running of the Performance Profile Creator (PPC) tool. It hides the complexities associated with running podman and specifying the mapping directories and it enables the creation of the performance profile.

Prerequisites
  • Access to the Node Tuning Operator image.

  • Access to the must-gather tarball.

Procedure
  1. Create a file on your local machine named, for example, run-perf-profile-creator.sh:

    $ vi run-perf-profile-creator.sh
  2. Paste the following code into the file:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    readonly CONTAINER_RUNTIME=${CONTAINER_RUNTIME:-podman}
    readonly CURRENT_SCRIPT=$(basename "$0")
    readonly CMD="${CONTAINER_RUNTIME} run --entrypoint performance-profile-creator"
    readonly IMG_EXISTS_CMD="${CONTAINER_RUNTIME} image exists"
    readonly IMG_PULL_CMD="${CONTAINER_RUNTIME} image pull"
    readonly MUST_GATHER_VOL="/must-gather"
    
    NTO_IMG="registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14"
    MG_TARBALL=""
    DATA_DIR=""
    
    usage() {
      print "Wrapper usage:"
      print "  ${CURRENT_SCRIPT} [-h] [-p image][-t path] -- [performance-profile-creator flags]"
      print ""
      print "Options:"
      print "   -h                 help for ${CURRENT_SCRIPT}"
      print "   -p                 Node Tuning Operator image"
      print "   -t                 path to a must-gather tarball"
    
      ${IMG_EXISTS_CMD} "${NTO_IMG}" && ${CMD} "${NTO_IMG}" -h
    }
    
    function cleanup {
      [ -d "${DATA_DIR}" ] && rm -rf "${DATA_DIR}"
    }
    trap cleanup EXIT
    
    exit_error() {
      print "error: $*"
      usage
      exit 1
    }
    
    print() {
      echo  "$*" >&2
    }
    
    check_requirements() {
      ${IMG_EXISTS_CMD} "${NTO_IMG}" || ${IMG_PULL_CMD} "${NTO_IMG}" || \
          exit_error "Node Tuning Operator image not found"
    
      [ -n "${MG_TARBALL}" ] || exit_error "Must-gather tarball file path is mandatory"
      [ -f "${MG_TARBALL}" ] || exit_error "Must-gather tarball file not found"
    
      DATA_DIR=$(mktemp -d -t "${CURRENT_SCRIPT}XXXX") || exit_error "Cannot create the data directory"
      tar -zxf "${MG_TARBALL}" --directory "${DATA_DIR}" || exit_error "Cannot decompress the must-gather tarball"
      chmod a+rx "${DATA_DIR}"
    
      return 0
    }
    
    main() {
      while getopts ':hp:t:' OPT; do
        case "${OPT}" in
          h)
            usage
            exit 0
            ;;
          p)
            NTO_IMG="${OPTARG}"
            ;;
          t)
            MG_TARBALL="${OPTARG}"
            ;;
          ?)
            exit_error "invalid argument: ${OPTARG}"
            ;;
        esac
      done
      shift $((OPTIND - 1))
    
      check_requirements || exit 1
    
      ${CMD} -v "${DATA_DIR}:${MUST_GATHER_VOL}:z" "${NTO_IMG}" "$@" --must-gather-dir-path "${MUST_GATHER_VOL}"
      echo "" 1>&2
    }
    
    main "$@"
  3. Add execute permissions for everyone on this script:

    $ chmod a+x run-perf-profile-creator.sh
  4. Optional: Display the run-perf-profile-creator.sh command usage:

    $ ./run-perf-profile-creator.sh -h
    Expected output
    Wrapper usage:
      run-perf-profile-creator.sh [-h] [-p image][-t path] -- [performance-profile-creator flags]
    
    Options:
       -h                 help for run-perf-profile-creator.sh
       -p                 Node Tuning Operator image (1)
       -t                 path to a must-gather tarball (2)
    A tool that automates creation of Performance Profiles
    
    Usage:
      performance-profile-creator [flags]
    
    Flags:
          --disable-ht                        Disable Hyperthreading
      -h, --help                              help for performance-profile-creator
          --info string                       Show cluster information; requires --must-gather-dir-path, ignore the other arguments. [Valid values: log, json] (default "log")
          --mcp-name string                   MCP name corresponding to the target machines (required)
          --must-gather-dir-path string       Must gather directory path (default "must-gather")
          --offlined-cpu-count int            Number of offlined CPUs
          --per-pod-power-management          Enable Per Pod Power Management
          --power-consumption-mode string     The power consumption mode.  [Valid values: default, low-latency, ultra-low-latency] (default "default")
          --profile-name string               Name of the performance profile to be created (default "performance")
          --reserved-cpu-count int            Number of reserved CPUs (required)
          --rt-kernel                         Enable Real Time Kernel (required)
          --split-reserved-cpus-across-numa   Split the Reserved CPUs across NUMA nodes
          --topology-manager-policy string    Kubelet Topology Manager Policy of the performance profile to be created. [Valid values: single-numa-node, best-effort, restricted] (default "restricted")
          --user-level-networking             Run with User level Networking(DPDK) enabled

    There two types of arguments:

    • Wrapper arguments namely -h, -p and -t

    • PPC arguments

    1 Optional: Specify the Node Tuning Operator image. If not set, the default upstream image is used: registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14.
    2 -t is a required wrapper script argument and specifies the path to a must-gather tarball.
  5. Run the performance profile creator tool in discovery mode:

    Discovery mode inspects your cluster using the output from must-gather. The output produced includes information on:

    • The NUMA cell partitioning with the allocated CPU IDs

    • Whether hyperthreading is enabled

    Using this information you can set appropriate values for some of the arguments supplied to the Performance Profile Creator tool.

    $ ./run-perf-profile-creator.sh -t /must-gather/must-gather.tar.gz -- --info=log

    The info option requires a value which specifies the output format. Possible values are log and JSON. The JSON format is reserved for debugging.

  6. Check the machine config pool:

    $ oc get mcp
    Example output
    NAME         CONFIG                                                 UPDATED   UPDATING   DEGRADED   MACHINECOUNT   READYMACHINECOUNT   UPDATEDMACHINECOUNT   DEGRADEDMACHINECOUNT   AGE
    master       rendered-master-acd1358917e9f98cbdb599aea622d78b       True      False      False      3              3                   3                     0                      22h
    worker-cnf   rendered-worker-cnf-1d871ac76e1951d32b2fe92369879826   False     True       False      2              1                   1                     0                      22h
  7. Create a performance profile:

    $ ./run-perf-profile-creator.sh -t /must-gather/must-gather.tar.gz -- --mcp-name=worker-cnf --reserved-cpu-count=2 --rt-kernel=true > my-performance-profile.yaml

    The Performance Profile Creator arguments are shown in the Performance Profile Creator arguments table. The following arguments are required:

    • reserved-cpu-count

    • mcp-name

    • rt-kernel

    The mcp-name argument in this example is set to worker-cnf based on the output of the command oc get mcp. For single-node OpenShift use --mcp-name=master.

  8. Review the created YAML file:

    $ cat my-performance-profile.yaml
    Example output
    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: performance
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 1-39,41-79
        reserved: 0,40
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
      numa:
        topologyPolicy: restricted
      realTimeKernel:
        enabled: false
  9. Apply the generated profile:

    Install the Node Tuning Operator before applying the profile.

    $ oc apply -f my-performance-profile.yaml

Performance Profile Creator arguments

Table 1. Performance Profile Creator arguments
Argument Description

disable-ht

Disable hyperthreading.

Possible values: true or false.

Default: false.

If this argument is set to true you should not disable hyperthreading in the BIOS. Disabling hyperthreading is accomplished with a kernel command line argument.

info

This captures cluster information and is used in discovery mode only. Discovery mode also requires the must-gather-dir-path argument. If any other arguments are set they are ignored.

Possible values:

  • log

  • JSON

    These options define the output format with the JSON format being reserved for debugging.

Default: log.

mcp-name

MCP name for example worker-cnf corresponding to the target machines. This parameter is required.

must-gather-dir-path

Must gather directory path. This parameter is required.

When the user runs the tool with the wrapper script must-gather is supplied by the script itself and the user must not specify it.

offlined-cpu-count

Number of offlined CPUs.

This must be a natural number greater than 0. If not enough logical processors are offlined then error messages are logged. The messages are:

Error: failed to compute the reserved and isolated CPUs: please ensure that reserved-cpu-count plus offlined-cpu-count should be in the range [0,1]
Error: failed to compute the reserved and isolated CPUs: please specify the offlined CPU count in the range [0,1]

power-consumption-mode

The power consumption mode.

Possible values:

  • default: CPU partitioning with enabled power management and basic low-latency.

  • low-latency: Enhanced measures to improve latency figures.

  • ultra-low-latency: Priority given to optimal latency, at the expense of power management.

Default: default.

per-pod-power-management

Enable per pod power management. You cannot use this argument if you configured ultra-low-latency as the power consumption mode.

Possible values: true or false.

Default: false.

profile-name

Name of the performance profile to create. Default: performance.

reserved-cpu-count

Number of reserved CPUs. This parameter is required.

This must be a natural number. A value of 0 is not allowed.

rt-kernel

Enable real-time kernel. This parameter is required.

Possible values: true or false.

split-reserved-cpus-across-numa

Split the reserved CPUs across NUMA nodes.

Possible values: true or false.

Default: false.

topology-manager-policy

Kubelet Topology Manager policy of the performance profile to be created.

Possible values:

  • single-numa-node

  • best-effort

  • restricted

Default: restricted.

user-level-networking

Run with user level networking (DPDK) enabled.

Possible values: true or false.

Default: false.

Reference performance profiles

Use the following reference performance profiles as the basis to develop your own custom profiles.

Performance profile template for clusters that use OVS-DPDK on OpenStack

To maximize machine performance in a cluster that uses Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit (OVS-DPDK) on Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP), you can use a performance profile.

You can use the following performance profile template to create a profile for your deployment.

Performance profile template for clusters that use OVS-DPDK
apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
kind: PerformanceProfile
metadata:
  name: cnf-performanceprofile
spec:
  additionalKernelArgs:
    - nmi_watchdog=0
    - audit=0
    - mce=off
    - processor.max_cstate=1
    - idle=poll
    - intel_idle.max_cstate=0
    - default_hugepagesz=1GB
    - hugepagesz=1G
    - intel_iommu=on
  cpu:
    isolated: <CPU_ISOLATED>
    reserved: <CPU_RESERVED>
  hugepages:
    defaultHugepagesSize: 1G
    pages:
      - count: <HUGEPAGES_COUNT>
        node: 0
        size: 1G
  nodeSelector:
    node-role.kubernetes.io/worker: ''
  realTimeKernel:
    enabled: false
    globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing: true

Insert values that are appropriate for your configuration for the CPU_ISOLATED, CPU_RESERVED, and HUGEPAGES_COUNT keys.

Telco RAN DU reference design performance profile template

The following performance profile configures node-level performance settings for OpenShift Container Platform clusters on commodity hardware to host telco RAN DU workloads.

Telco RAN DU reference design performance profile
apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
kind: PerformanceProfile
metadata:
  # if you change this name make sure the 'include' line in TunedPerformancePatch.yaml
  # matches this name: include=openshift-node-performance-${PerformanceProfile.metadata.name}
  # Also in file 'validatorCRs/informDuValidator.yaml': 
  # name: 50-performance-${PerformanceProfile.metadata.name}
  name: openshift-node-performance-profile
  annotations:
    ran.openshift.io/reference-configuration: "ran-du.redhat.com"
spec:
  additionalKernelArgs:
    - "rcupdate.rcu_normal_after_boot=0"
    - "efi=runtime"
    - "vfio_pci.enable_sriov=1"
    - "vfio_pci.disable_idle_d3=1"
    - "module_blacklist=irdma"
  cpu:
    isolated: $isolated
    reserved: $reserved
  hugepages:
    defaultHugepagesSize: $defaultHugepagesSize
    pages:
      - size: $size
        count: $count
        node: $node
  machineConfigPoolSelector:
    pools.operator.machineconfiguration.openshift.io/$mcp: ""
  nodeSelector:
    node-role.kubernetes.io/$mcp: ""
  numa:
    topologyPolicy: "restricted"
  # To use the standard (non-realtime) kernel, set enabled to false
  realTimeKernel:
    enabled: true
  workloadHints:
    # WorkloadHints defines the set of upper level flags for different type of workloads.
    # See https://github.com/openshift/cluster-node-tuning-operator/blob/master/docs/performanceprofile/performance_profile.md#workloadhints
    # for detailed descriptions of each item.
    # The configuration below is set for a low latency, performance mode.
    realTime: true
    highPowerConsumption: false
    perPodPowerManagement: false

Telco core reference design performance profile template

The following performance profile configures node-level performance settings for OpenShift Container Platform clusters on commodity hardware to host telco core workloads.

Telco core reference design performance profile
apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
kind: PerformanceProfile
metadata:
  # if you change this name make sure the 'include' line in TunedPerformancePatch.yaml
  # matches this name: include=openshift-node-performance-${PerformanceProfile.metadata.name}
  # Also in file 'validatorCRs/informDuValidator.yaml': 
  # name: 50-performance-${PerformanceProfile.metadata.name}
  name: openshift-node-performance-profile
  annotations:
    ran.openshift.io/reference-configuration: "ran-du.redhat.com"
spec:
  additionalKernelArgs:
    - "rcupdate.rcu_normal_after_boot=0"
    - "efi=runtime"
    - "vfio_pci.enable_sriov=1"
    - "vfio_pci.disable_idle_d3=1"
    - "module_blacklist=irdma"
  cpu:
    isolated: $isolated
    reserved: $reserved
  hugepages:
    defaultHugepagesSize: $defaultHugepagesSize
    pages:
      - size: $size
        count: $count
        node: $node
  machineConfigPoolSelector:
    pools.operator.machineconfiguration.openshift.io/$mcp: ""
  nodeSelector:
    node-role.kubernetes.io/$mcp: ""
  numa:
    topologyPolicy: "restricted"
  # To use the standard (non-realtime) kernel, set enabled to false
  realTimeKernel:
    enabled: true
  workloadHints:
    # WorkloadHints defines the set of upper level flags for different type of workloads.
    # See https://github.com/openshift/cluster-node-tuning-operator/blob/master/docs/performanceprofile/performance_profile.md#workloadhints
    # for detailed descriptions of each item.
    # The configuration below is set for a low latency, performance mode.
    realTime: true
    highPowerConsumption: false
    perPodPowerManagement: false

Supported performance profile API versions

The Node Tuning Operator supports v2, v1, and v1alpha1 for the performance profile apiVersion field. The v1 and v1alpha1 APIs are identical. The v2 API includes an optional boolean field globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing with a default value of false.

Upgrading the performance profile to use device interrupt processing

When you upgrade the Node Tuning Operator performance profile custom resource definition (CRD) from v1 or v1alpha1 to v2, globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing is set to true on existing profiles.

globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing toggles whether IRQ load balancing will be disabled for the Isolated CPU set. When the option is set to true it disables IRQ load balancing for the Isolated CPU set. Setting the option to false allows the IRQs to be balanced across all CPUs.

Upgrading Node Tuning Operator API from v1alpha1 to v1

When upgrading Node Tuning Operator API version from v1alpha1 to v1, the v1alpha1 performance profiles are converted on-the-fly using a "None" Conversion strategy and served to the Node Tuning Operator with API version v1.

Upgrading Node Tuning Operator API from v1alpha1 or v1 to v2

When upgrading from an older Node Tuning Operator API version, the existing v1 and v1alpha1 performance profiles are converted using a conversion webhook that injects the globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing field with a value of true.

Configuring node power consumption and realtime processing with workload hints

Procedure
  1. Create a PerformanceProfile appropriate for the environment’s hardware and topology as described in the table in "Understanding workload hints". Adjust the profile to match the expected workload. In this example, we tune for the lowest possible latency.

  2. Add the highPowerConsumption and realTime workload hints. Both are set to true here.

        apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
        kind: PerformanceProfile
        metadata:
          name: workload-hints
        spec:
          ...
          workloadHints:
            highPowerConsumption: true (1)
            realTime: true (2)
    1 If highPowerConsumption is true, the node is tuned for very low latency at the cost of increased power consumption.
    2 Disables some debugging and monitoring features that can affect system latency.

When the realTime workload hint flag is set to true in a performance profile, add the cpu-quota.crio.io: disable annotation to every guaranteed pod with pinned CPUs. This annotation is necessary to prevent the degradation of the process performance within the pod. If the realTime workload hint is not explicitly set then it defaults to true.

The following table describes how combinations of power consumption and real-time settings impact latency.

Table 2. Impact of combinations of power consumption and real-time settings on latency
Performance Profile creator setting Hint Environment Description

Default

workloadHints:
highPowerConsumption: false
realTime: false

High throughput cluster without latency requirements

Performance achieved through CPU partitioning only.

Low-latency

workloadHints:
highPowerConsumption: false
realTime: true

Regional data-centers

Both energy savings and low-latency are desirable: compromise between power management, latency and throughput.

Ultra-low-latency

workloadHints:
highPowerConsumption: true
realTime: true

Far edge clusters, latency critical workloads

Optimized for absolute minimal latency and maximum determinism at the cost of increased power consumption.

Per-pod power management

workloadHints:
realTime: true
highPowerConsumption: false
perPodPowerManagement: true

Critical and non-critical workloads

Allows for power management per pod.

Configuring power saving for nodes that run colocated high and low priority workloads

You can enable power savings for a node that has low priority workloads that are colocated with high priority workloads without impacting the latency or throughput of the high priority workloads. Power saving is possible without modifications to the workloads themselves.

The feature is supported on Intel Ice Lake and later generations of Intel CPUs. The capabilities of the processor might impact the latency and throughput of the high priority workloads.

Prerequisites
  • You enabled C-states and operating system controlled P-states in the BIOS

Procedure
  1. Generate a PerformanceProfile with the per-pod-power-management argument set to true:

    $ podman run --entrypoint performance-profile-creator -v \
    /must-gather:/must-gather:z registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-cluster-node-tuning-operator:v4.14 \
    --mcp-name=worker-cnf --reserved-cpu-count=20 --rt-kernel=true \
    --split-reserved-cpus-across-numa=false --topology-manager-policy=single-numa-node \
    --must-gather-dir-path /must-gather --power-consumption-mode=low-latency \ (1)
    --per-pod-power-management=true > my-performance-profile.yaml
    1 The power-consumption-mode argument must be default or low-latency when the per-pod-power-management argument is set to true.
    Example PerformanceProfile with perPodPowerManagement
    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
         name: performance
    spec:
        [.....]
        workloadHints:
            realTime: true
            highPowerConsumption: false
            perPodPowerManagement: true
  2. Set the default cpufreq governor as an additional kernel argument in the PerformanceProfile custom resource (CR):

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
         name: performance
    spec:
        ...
        additionalKernelArgs:
        - cpufreq.default_governor=schedutil (1)
    1 Using the schedutil governor is recommended, however, you can use other governors such as the ondemand or powersave governors.
  3. Set the maximum CPU frequency in the TunedPerformancePatch CR:

    spec:
      profile:
      - data: |
          [sysfs]
          /sys/devices/system/cpu/intel_pstate/max_perf_pct = <x> (1)
    1 The max_perf_pct controls the maximum frequency that the cpufreq driver is allowed to set as a percentage of the maximum supported cpu frequency. This value applies to all CPUs. You can check the maximum supported frequency in /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/cpuinfo_max_freq. As a starting point, you can use a percentage that caps all CPUs at the All Cores Turbo frequency. The All Cores Turbo frequency is the frequency that all cores will run at when the cores are all fully occupied.

Restricting CPUs for infra and application containers

Generic housekeeping and workload tasks use CPUs in a way that may impact latency-sensitive processes. By default, the container runtime uses all online CPUs to run all containers together, which can result in context switches and spikes in latency. Partitioning the CPUs prevents noisy processes from interfering with latency-sensitive processes by separating them from each other. The following table describes how processes run on a CPU after you have tuned the node using the Node Tuning Operator:

Table 3. Process' CPU assignments
Process type Details

Burstable and BestEffort pods

Runs on any CPU except where low latency workload is running

Infrastructure pods

Runs on any CPU except where low latency workload is running

Interrupts

Redirects to reserved CPUs (optional in OpenShift Container Platform 4.7 and later)

Kernel processes

Pins to reserved CPUs

Latency-sensitive workload pods

Pins to a specific set of exclusive CPUs from the isolated pool

OS processes/systemd services

Pins to reserved CPUs

The allocatable capacity of cores on a node for pods of all QoS process types, Burstable, BestEffort, or Guaranteed, is equal to the capacity of the isolated pool. The capacity of the reserved pool is removed from the node’s total core capacity for use by the cluster and operating system housekeeping duties.

Example 1

A node features a capacity of 100 cores. Using a performance profile, the cluster administrator allocates 50 cores to the isolated pool and 50 cores to the reserved pool. The cluster administrator assigns 25 cores to QoS Guaranteed pods and 25 cores for BestEffort or Burstable pods. This matches the capacity of the isolated pool.

Example 2

A node features a capacity of 100 cores. Using a performance profile, the cluster administrator allocates 50 cores to the isolated pool and 50 cores to the reserved pool. The cluster administrator assigns 50 cores to QoS Guaranteed pods and one core for BestEffort or Burstable pods. This exceeds the capacity of the isolated pool by one core. Pod scheduling fails because of insufficient CPU capacity.

The exact partitioning pattern to use depends on many factors like hardware, workload characteristics and the expected system load. Some sample use cases are as follows:

  • If the latency-sensitive workload uses specific hardware, such as a network interface controller (NIC), ensure that the CPUs in the isolated pool are as close as possible to this hardware. At a minimum, you should place the workload in the same Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) node.

  • The reserved pool is used for handling all interrupts. When depending on system networking, allocate a sufficiently-sized reserve pool to handle all the incoming packet interrupts. In 4.14 and later versions, workloads can optionally be labeled as sensitive.

The decision regarding which specific CPUs should be used for reserved and isolated partitions requires detailed analysis and measurements. Factors like NUMA affinity of devices and memory play a role. The selection also depends on the workload architecture and the specific use case.

The reserved and isolated CPU pools must not overlap and together must span all available cores in the worker node.

To ensure that housekeeping tasks and workloads do not interfere with each other, specify two groups of CPUs in the spec section of the performance profile.

  • isolated - Specifies the CPUs for the application container workloads. These CPUs have the lowest latency. Processes in this group have no interruptions and can, for example, reach much higher DPDK zero packet loss bandwidth.

  • reserved - Specifies the CPUs for the cluster and operating system housekeeping duties. Threads in the reserved group are often busy. Do not run latency-sensitive applications in the reserved group. Latency-sensitive applications run in the isolated group.

Procedure
  1. Create a performance profile appropriate for the environment’s hardware and topology.

  2. Add the reserved and isolated parameters with the CPUs you want reserved and isolated for the infra and application containers:

    ´╗┐apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: infra-cpus
    spec:
      cpu:
        reserved: "0-4,9" (1)
        isolated: "5-8" (2)
      nodeSelector: (3)
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker: ""
    1 Specify which CPUs are for infra containers to perform cluster and operating system housekeeping duties.
    2 Specify which CPUs are for application containers to run workloads.
    3 Optional: Specify a node selector to apply the performance profile to specific nodes.

Configuring Hyper-Threading for a cluster

To configure Hyper-Threading for an OpenShift Container Platform cluster, set the CPU threads in the performance profile to the same cores that are configured for the reserved or isolated CPU pools.

If you configure a performance profile, and subsequently change the Hyper-Threading configuration for the host, ensure that you update the CPU isolated and reserved fields in the PerformanceProfile YAML to match the new configuration.

Disabling a previously enabled host Hyper-Threading configuration can cause the CPU core IDs listed in the PerformanceProfile YAML to be incorrect. This incorrect configuration can cause the node to become unavailable because the listed CPUs can no longer be found.

Prerequisites
  • Access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.

  • Install the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure
  1. Ascertain which threads are running on what CPUs for the host you want to configure.

    You can view which threads are running on the host CPUs by logging in to the cluster and running the following command:

    $ lscpu --all --extended
    Example output
    CPU NODE SOCKET CORE L1d:L1i:L2:L3 ONLINE MAXMHZ    MINMHZ
    0   0    0      0    0:0:0:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    1   0    0      1    1:1:1:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    2   0    0      2    2:2:2:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    3   0    0      3    3:3:3:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    4   0    0      0    0:0:0:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    5   0    0      1    1:1:1:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    6   0    0      2    2:2:2:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000
    7   0    0      3    3:3:3:0       yes    4800.0000 400.0000

    In this example, there are eight logical CPU cores running on four physical CPU cores. CPU0 and CPU4 are running on physical Core0, CPU1 and CPU5 are running on physical Core 1, and so on.

    Alternatively, to view the threads that are set for a particular physical CPU core (cpu0 in the example below), open a shell prompt and run the following:

    $ cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/topology/thread_siblings_list
    Example output
    0-4
  2. Apply the isolated and reserved CPUs in the PerformanceProfile YAML. For example, you can set logical cores CPU0 and CPU4 as isolated, and logical cores CPU1 to CPU3 and CPU5 to CPU7 as reserved. When you configure reserved and isolated CPUs, the infra containers in pods use the reserved CPUs and the application containers use the isolated CPUs.

    ...
      cpu:
        isolated: 0,4
        reserved: 1-3,5-7
    ...

    The reserved and isolated CPU pools must not overlap and together must span all available cores in the worker node.

Hyper-Threading is enabled by default on most Intel processors. If you enable Hyper-Threading, all threads processed by a particular core must be isolated or processed on the same core.

When Hyper-Threading is enabled, all guaranteed pods must use multiples of the simultaneous multi-threading (SMT) level to avoid a "noisy neighbor" situation that can cause the pod to fail. See Static policy options for more information.

Disabling Hyper-Threading for low latency applications

When configuring clusters for low latency processing, consider whether you want to disable Hyper-Threading before you deploy the cluster. To disable Hyper-Threading, perform the following steps:

  1. Create a performance profile that is appropriate for your hardware and topology.

  2. Set nosmt as an additional kernel argument. The following example performance profile illustrates this setting:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: example-performanceprofile
    spec:
      additionalKernelArgs:
        - nmi_watchdog=0
        - audit=0
        - mce=off
        - processor.max_cstate=1
        - idle=poll
        - intel_idle.max_cstate=0
        - nosmt
      cpu:
        isolated: 2-3
        reserved: 0-1
      hugepages:
        defaultHugepagesSize: 1G
        pages:
          - count: 2
            node: 0
            size: 1G
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/performance: ''
      realTimeKernel:
        enabled: true

    When you configure reserved and isolated CPUs, the infra containers in pods use the reserved CPUs and the application containers use the isolated CPUs.

Managing device interrupt processing for guaranteed pod isolated CPUs

The Node Tuning Operator can manage host CPUs by dividing them into reserved CPUs for cluster and operating system housekeeping duties, including pod infra containers, and isolated CPUs for application containers to run the workloads. This allows you to set CPUs for low latency workloads as isolated.

Device interrupts are load balanced between all isolated and reserved CPUs to avoid CPUs being overloaded, with the exception of CPUs where there is a guaranteed pod running. Guaranteed pod CPUs are prevented from processing device interrupts when the relevant annotations are set for the pod.

In the performance profile, globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing is used to manage whether device interrupts are processed or not. For certain workloads, the reserved CPUs are not always sufficient for dealing with device interrupts, and for this reason, device interrupts are not globally disabled on the isolated CPUs. By default, Node Tuning Operator does not disable device interrupts on isolated CPUs.

Finding the effective IRQ affinity setting for a node

Some IRQ controllers lack support for IRQ affinity setting and will always expose all online CPUs as the IRQ mask. These IRQ controllers effectively run on CPU 0.

The following are examples of drivers and hardware that Red Hat are aware lack support for IRQ affinity setting. The list is, by no means, exhaustive:

  • Some RAID controller drivers, such as megaraid_sas

  • Many non-volatile memory express (NVMe) drivers

  • Some LAN on motherboard (LOM) network controllers

  • The driver uses managed_irqs

The reason they do not support IRQ affinity setting might be associated with factors such as the type of processor, the IRQ controller, or the circuitry connections in the motherboard.

If the effective affinity of any IRQ is set to an isolated CPU, it might be a sign of some hardware or driver not supporting IRQ affinity setting. To find the effective affinity, log in to the host and run the following command:

$ find /proc/irq -name effective_affinity -printf "%p: " -exec cat {} \;
Example output
/proc/irq/0/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/1/effective_affinity: 8
/proc/irq/2/effective_affinity: 0
/proc/irq/3/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/4/effective_affinity: 2
/proc/irq/5/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/6/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/7/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/8/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/9/effective_affinity: 2
/proc/irq/10/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/11/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/12/effective_affinity: 4
/proc/irq/13/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/14/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/15/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/24/effective_affinity: 2
/proc/irq/25/effective_affinity: 4
/proc/irq/26/effective_affinity: 2
/proc/irq/27/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/28/effective_affinity: 8
/proc/irq/29/effective_affinity: 4
/proc/irq/30/effective_affinity: 4
/proc/irq/31/effective_affinity: 8
/proc/irq/32/effective_affinity: 8
/proc/irq/33/effective_affinity: 1
/proc/irq/34/effective_affinity: 2

Some drivers use managed_irqs, whose affinity is managed internally by the kernel and userspace cannot change the affinity. In some cases, these IRQs might be assigned to isolated CPUs. For more information about managed_irqs, see Affinity of managed interrupts cannot be changed even if they target isolated CPU.

Configuring a node for IRQ dynamic load balancing

Configure a cluster node for IRQ dynamic load balancing to control which cores can receive device interrupt requests (IRQ).

Prerequisites
  • For core isolation, all server hardware components must support IRQ affinity. To check if the hardware components of your server support IRQ affinity, view the server’s hardware specifications or contact your hardware provider.

Procedure
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Container Platform cluster as a user with cluster-admin privileges.

  2. Set the performance profile apiVersion to use performance.openshift.io/v2.

  3. Remove the globallyDisableIrqLoadBalancing field or set it to false.

  4. Set the appropriate isolated and reserved CPUs. The following snippet illustrates a profile that reserves 2 CPUs. IRQ load-balancing is enabled for pods running on the isolated CPU set:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: dynamic-irq-profile
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 2-5
        reserved: 0-1
    ...

    When you configure reserved and isolated CPUs, the infra containers in pods use the reserved CPUs and the application containers use the isolated CPUs.

  5. Create the pod that uses exclusive CPUs, and set irq-load-balancing.crio.io and cpu-quota.crio.io annotations to disable. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Pod
    metadata:
      name: dynamic-irq-pod
      annotations:
         irq-load-balancing.crio.io: "disable"
         cpu-quota.crio.io: "disable"
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: dynamic-irq-pod
        image: "registry.redhat.io/openshift4/cnf-tests-rhel8:v4.14"
        command: ["sleep", "10h"]
        resources:
          requests:
            cpu: 2
            memory: "200M"
          limits:
            cpu: 2
            memory: "200M"
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
      runtimeClassName: performance-dynamic-irq-profile
    ...
  6. Enter the pod runtimeClassName in the form performance-<profile_name>, where <profile_name> is the name from the PerformanceProfile YAML, in this example, performance-dynamic-irq-profile.

  7. Set the node selector to target a cnf-worker.

  8. Ensure the pod is running correctly. Status should be running, and the correct cnf-worker node should be set:

    $ oc get pod -o wide
    Expected output
    NAME              READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE     IP             NODE          NOMINATED NODE   READINESS GATES
    dynamic-irq-pod   1/1     Running   0          5h33m   <ip-address>   <node-name>   <none>           <none>
  9. Get the CPUs that the pod configured for IRQ dynamic load balancing runs on:

    $ oc exec -it dynamic-irq-pod -- /bin/bash -c "grep Cpus_allowed_list /proc/self/status | awk '{print $2}'"
    Expected output
    Cpus_allowed_list:  2-3
  10. Ensure the node configuration is applied correctly. Log in to the node to verify the configuration.

    $ oc debug node/<node-name>
    Expected output
    Starting pod/<node-name>-debug ...
    To use host binaries, run `chroot /host`
    
    Pod IP: <ip-address>
    If you don't see a command prompt, try pressing enter.
    
    sh-4.4#
  11. Verify that you can use the node file system:

    sh-4.4# chroot /host
    Expected output
    sh-4.4#
  12. Ensure the default system CPU affinity mask does not include the dynamic-irq-pod CPUs, for example, CPUs 2 and 3.

    $ cat /proc/irq/default_smp_affinity
    Example output
    33
  13. Ensure the system IRQs are not configured to run on the dynamic-irq-pod CPUs:

    find /proc/irq/ -name smp_affinity_list -exec sh -c 'i="$1"; mask=$(cat $i); file=$(echo $i); echo $file: $mask' _ {} \;
    Example output
    /proc/irq/0/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/1/smp_affinity_list: 5
    /proc/irq/2/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/3/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/4/smp_affinity_list: 0
    /proc/irq/5/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/6/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/7/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/8/smp_affinity_list: 4
    /proc/irq/9/smp_affinity_list: 4
    /proc/irq/10/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/11/smp_affinity_list: 0
    /proc/irq/12/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/13/smp_affinity_list: 0-5
    /proc/irq/14/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/15/smp_affinity_list: 0
    /proc/irq/24/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/25/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/26/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/27/smp_affinity_list: 5
    /proc/irq/28/smp_affinity_list: 1
    /proc/irq/29/smp_affinity_list: 0
    /proc/irq/30/smp_affinity_list: 0-5

Configuring huge pages

Nodes must pre-allocate huge pages used in an OpenShift Container Platform cluster. Use the Node Tuning Operator to allocate huge pages on a specific node.

OpenShift Container Platform provides a method for creating and allocating huge pages. Node Tuning Operator provides an easier method for doing this using the performance profile.

For example, in the hugepages pages section of the performance profile, you can specify multiple blocks of size, count, and, optionally, node:

hugepages:
   defaultHugepagesSize: "1G"
   pages:
   - size:  "1G"
     count:  4
     node:  0 (1)
1 node is the NUMA node in which the huge pages are allocated. If you omit node, the pages are evenly spread across all NUMA nodes.

Wait for the relevant machine config pool status that indicates the update is finished.

These are the only configuration steps you need to do to allocate huge pages.

Verification
  • To verify the configuration, see the /proc/meminfo file on the node:

    $ oc debug node/ip-10-0-141-105.ec2.internal
    # grep -i huge /proc/meminfo
    Example output
    AnonHugePages:    ###### ##
    ShmemHugePages:        0 kB
    HugePages_Total:       2
    HugePages_Free:        2
    HugePages_Rsvd:        0
    HugePages_Surp:        0
    Hugepagesize:       #### ##
    Hugetlb:            #### ##
  • Use oc describe to report the new size:

    $ oc describe node worker-0.ocp4poc.example.com | grep -i huge
    Example output
                                       hugepages-1g=true
     hugepages-###:  ###
     hugepages-###:  ###

Allocating multiple huge page sizes

You can request huge pages with different sizes under the same container. This allows you to define more complicated pods consisting of containers with different huge page size needs.

For example, you can define sizes 1G and 2M and the Node Tuning Operator will configure both sizes on the node, as shown here:

spec:
  hugepages:
    defaultHugepagesSize: 1G
    pages:
    - count: 1024
      node: 0
      size: 2M
    - count: 4
      node: 1
      size: 1G

Reducing NIC queues using the Node Tuning Operator

The Node Tuning Operator facilitates reducing NIC queues for enhanced performance. Adjustments are made using the performance profile, allowing customization of queues for different network devices.

Adjusting the NIC queues with the performance profile

The performance profile lets you adjust the queue count for each network device.

Supported network devices:

  • Non-virtual network devices

  • Network devices that support multiple queues (channels)

Unsupported network devices:

  • Pure software network interfaces

  • Block devices

  • Intel DPDK virtual functions

Prerequisites
  • Access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.

  • Install the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure
  1. Log in to the OpenShift Container Platform cluster running the Node Tuning Operator as a user with cluster-admin privileges.

  2. Create and apply a performance profile appropriate for your hardware and topology. For guidance on creating a profile, see the "Creating a performance profile" section.

  3. Edit this created performance profile:

    $ oc edit -f <your_profile_name>.yaml
  4. Populate the spec field with the net object. The object list can contain two fields:

    • userLevelNetworking is a required field specified as a boolean flag. If userLevelNetworking is true, the queue count is set to the reserved CPU count for all supported devices. The default is false.

    • devices is an optional field specifying a list of devices that will have the queues set to the reserved CPU count. If the device list is empty, the configuration applies to all network devices. The configuration is as follows:

      • interfaceName: This field specifies the interface name, and it supports shell-style wildcards, which can be positive or negative.

        • Example wildcard syntax is as follows: <string> .*

        • Negative rules are prefixed with an exclamation mark. To apply the net queue changes to all devices other than the excluded list, use !<device>, for example, !eno1.

      • vendorID: The network device vendor ID represented as a 16-bit hexadecimal number with a 0x prefix.

      • deviceID: The network device ID (model) represented as a 16-bit hexadecimal number with a 0x prefix.

        When a deviceID is specified, the vendorID must also be defined. A device that matches all of the device identifiers specified in a device entry interfaceName, vendorID, or a pair of vendorID plus deviceID qualifies as a network device. This network device then has its net queues count set to the reserved CPU count.

        When two or more devices are specified, the net queues count is set to any net device that matches one of them.

  5. Set the queue count to the reserved CPU count for all devices by using this example performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: manual
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 3-51,55-103
        reserved: 0-2,52-54
      net:
        userLevelNetworking: true
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
  6. Set the queue count to the reserved CPU count for all devices matching any of the defined device identifiers by using this example performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: manual
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 3-51,55-103
        reserved: 0-2,52-54
      net:
        userLevelNetworking: true
        devices:
        - interfaceName: "eth0"
        - interfaceName: "eth1"
        - vendorID: "0x1af4"
          deviceID: "0x1000"
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
  7. Set the queue count to the reserved CPU count for all devices starting with the interface name eth by using this example performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: manual
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 3-51,55-103
        reserved: 0-2,52-54
      net:
        userLevelNetworking: true
        devices:
        - interfaceName: "eth*"
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
  8. Set the queue count to the reserved CPU count for all devices with an interface named anything other than eno1 by using this example performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: manual
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 3-51,55-103
        reserved: 0-2,52-54
      net:
        userLevelNetworking: true
        devices:
        - interfaceName: "!eno1"
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
  9. Set the queue count to the reserved CPU count for all devices that have an interface name eth0, vendorID of 0x1af4, and deviceID of 0x1000 by using this example performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    kind: PerformanceProfile
    metadata:
      name: manual
    spec:
      cpu:
        isolated: 3-51,55-103
        reserved: 0-2,52-54
      net:
        userLevelNetworking: true
        devices:
        - interfaceName: "eth0"
        - vendorID: "0x1af4"
          deviceID: "0x1000"
      nodeSelector:
        node-role.kubernetes.io/worker-cnf: ""
  10. Apply the updated performance profile:

    $ oc apply -f <your_profile_name>.yaml
Additional resources

Verifying the queue status

In this section, a number of examples illustrate different performance profiles and how to verify the changes are applied.

Example 1

In this example, the net queue count is set to the reserved CPU count (2) for all supported devices.

The relevant section from the performance profile is:

apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
metadata:
  name: performance
spec:
  kind: PerformanceProfile
  spec:
    cpu:
      reserved: 0-1  #total = 2
      isolated: 2-8
    net:
      userLevelNetworking: true
# ...
  • Display the status of the queues associated with a device using the following command:

    Run this command on the node where the performance profile was applied.

    $ ethtool -l <device>
  • Verify the queue status before the profile is applied:

    $ ethtool -l ens4
    Example output
    Channel parameters for ens4:
    Pre-set maximums:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   4
    Current hardware settings:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   4
  • Verify the queue status after the profile is applied:

    $ ethtool -l ens4
    Example output
    Channel parameters for ens4:
    Pre-set maximums:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   4
    Current hardware settings:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   2 (1)
    
1 The combined channel shows that the total count of reserved CPUs for all supported devices is 2. This matches what is configured in the performance profile.
Example 2

In this example, the net queue count is set to the reserved CPU count (2) for all supported network devices with a specific vendorID.

The relevant section from the performance profile is:

apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
metadata:
  name: performance
spec:
  kind: PerformanceProfile
  spec:
    cpu:
      reserved: 0-1  #total = 2
      isolated: 2-8
    net:
      userLevelNetworking: true
      devices:
      - vendorID = 0x1af4
# ...
  • Display the status of the queues associated with a device using the following command:

    Run this command on the node where the performance profile was applied.

    $ ethtool -l <device>
  • Verify the queue status after the profile is applied:

    $ ethtool -l ens4
    Example output
    Channel parameters for ens4:
    Pre-set maximums:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   4
    Current hardware settings:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   2 (1)
    
1 The total count of reserved CPUs for all supported devices with vendorID=0x1af4 is 2. For example, if there is another network device ens2 with vendorID=0x1af4 it will also have total net queues of 2. This matches what is configured in the performance profile.
Example 3

In this example, the net queue count is set to the reserved CPU count (2) for all supported network devices that match any of the defined device identifiers.

The command udevadm info provides a detailed report on a device. In this example the devices are:

# udevadm info -p /sys/class/net/ens4
...
E: ID_MODEL_ID=0x1000
E: ID_VENDOR_ID=0x1af4
E: INTERFACE=ens4
...
# udevadm info -p /sys/class/net/eth0
...
E: ID_MODEL_ID=0x1002
E: ID_VENDOR_ID=0x1001
E: INTERFACE=eth0
...
  • Set the net queues to 2 for a device with interfaceName equal to eth0 and any devices that have a vendorID=0x1af4 with the following performance profile:

    apiVersion: performance.openshift.io/v2
    metadata:
      name: performance
    spec:
      kind: PerformanceProfile
        spec:
          cpu:
            reserved: 0-1  #total = 2
            isolated: 2-8
          net:
            userLevelNetworking: true
            devices:
            - interfaceName = eth0
            - vendorID = 0x1af4
    ...
  • Verify the queue status after the profile is applied:

    $ ethtool -l ens4
    Example output
    Channel parameters for ens4:
    Pre-set maximums:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   4
    Current hardware settings:
    RX:         0
    TX:         0
    Other:      0
    Combined:   2 (1)
    
    1 The total count of reserved CPUs for all supported devices with vendorID=0x1af4 is set to 2. For example, if there is another network device ens2 with vendorID=0x1af4, it will also have the total net queues set to 2. Similarly, a device with interfaceName equal to eth0 will have total net queues set to 2.

Logging associated with adjusting NIC queues

Log messages detailing the assigned devices are recorded in the respective Tuned daemon logs. The following messages might be recorded to the /var/log/tuned/tuned.log file:

  • An INFO message is recorded detailing the successfully assigned devices:

    INFO tuned.plugins.base: instance net_test (net): assigning devices ens1, ens2, ens3
  • A WARNING message is recorded if none of the devices can be assigned:

    WARNING  tuned.plugins.base: instance net_test: no matching devices available