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Understanding how to evacuate pods on nodes

Evacuating pods allows you to migrate all or selected pods from a given node or nodes.

You can only evacuate pods backed by a replication controller. The replication controller creates new pods on other nodes and removes the existing pods from the specified node(s).

Bare pods, meaning those not backed by a replication controller, are unaffected by default. You can evacuate a subset of pods by specifying a pod-selector. Pod selectors are based on labels, so all the pods with the specified label will be evacuated.

Procedure
  1. Mark the nodes unschedulable before performing the pod evacuation.

    1. Mark the node as unschedulable:

      $ oc adm cordon <node1>
      Example output
      node/<node1> cordoned
    2. Check that the node status is Ready,SchedulingDisabled:

      $ oc get node <node1>
      Example output
      NAME        STATUS                     ROLES     AGE       VERSION
      <node1>     Ready,SchedulingDisabled   worker    1d        v1.25.0
  2. Evacuate the pods using one of the following methods:

    • Evacuate all or selected pods on one or more nodes:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> [--pod-selector=<pod_selector>]
    • Force the deletion of bare pods using the --force option. When set to true, deletion continues even if there are pods not managed by a replication controller, replica set, job, daemon set, or stateful set:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> --force=true
    • Set a period of time in seconds for each pod to terminate gracefully, use --grace-period. If negative, the default value specified in the pod will be used:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> --grace-period=-1
    • Ignore pods managed by daemon sets using the --ignore-daemonsets flag set to true:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> --ignore-daemonsets=true
    • Set the length of time to wait before giving up using the --timeout flag. A value of 0 sets an infinite length of time:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> --timeout=5s
    • Delete pods even if there are pods using emptyDir volumes by setting the --delete-emptydir-data flag to true. Local data is deleted when the node is drained:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2> --delete-emptydir-data=true
    • List objects that will be migrated without actually performing the evacuation, using the --dry-run option set to true:

      $ oc adm drain <node1> <node2>  --dry-run=true

      Instead of specifying specific node names (for example, <node1> <node2>), you can use the --selector=<node_selector> option to evacuate pods on selected nodes.

  3. Mark the node as schedulable when done.

    $ oc adm uncordon <node1>

Understanding how to update labels on nodes

You can update any label on a node.

Node labels are not persisted after a node is deleted even if the node is backed up by a Machine.

Any change to a MachineSet object is not applied to existing machines owned by the compute machine set. For example, labels edited or added to an existing MachineSet object are not propagated to existing machines and nodes associated with the compute machine set.

  • The following command adds or updates labels on a node:

    $ oc label node <node> <key_1>=<value_1> ... <key_n>=<value_n>

    For example:

    $ oc label nodes webconsole-7f7f6 unhealthy=true

    You can alternatively apply the following YAML to apply the label:

    kind: Node
    apiVersion: v1
    metadata:
      name: webconsole-7f7f6
      labels:
        unhealthy: 'true'
  • The following command updates all pods in the namespace:

    $ oc label pods --all <key_1>=<value_1>

    For example:

    $ oc label pods --all status=unhealthy

Understanding how to mark nodes as unschedulable or schedulable

By default, healthy nodes with a Ready status are marked as schedulable, which means that you can place new pods on the node. Manually marking a node as unschedulable blocks any new pods from being scheduled on the node. Existing pods on the node are not affected.

  • The following command marks a node or nodes as unschedulable:

    Example output
    $ oc adm cordon <node>

    For example:

    $ oc adm cordon node1.example.com
    Example output
    node/node1.example.com cordoned
    
    NAME                 LABELS                                        STATUS
    node1.example.com    kubernetes.io/hostname=node1.example.com      Ready,SchedulingDisabled
  • The following command marks a currently unschedulable node or nodes as schedulable:

    $ oc adm uncordon <node1>

    Alternatively, instead of specifying specific node names (for example, <node>), you can use the --selector=<node_selector> option to mark selected nodes as schedulable or unschedulable.

Deleting nodes

Deleting nodes from a cluster

When you delete a node using the CLI, the node object is deleted in Kubernetes, but the pods that exist on the node are not deleted. Any bare pods not backed by a replication controller become inaccessible to OpenShift Container Platform. Pods backed by replication controllers are rescheduled to other available nodes. You must delete local manifest pods.

Procedure

To delete a node from the OpenShift Container Platform cluster, edit the appropriate MachineSet object:

If you are running cluster on bare metal, you cannot delete a node by editing MachineSet objects. Compute machine sets are only available when a cluster is integrated with a cloud provider. Instead you must unschedule and drain the node before manually deleting it.

  1. View the compute machine sets that are in the cluster:

    $ oc get machinesets -n openshift-machine-api

    The compute machine sets are listed in the form of <clusterid>-worker-<aws-region-az>.

  2. Scale the compute machine set:

    $ oc scale --replicas=2 machineset <machineset> -n openshift-machine-api

    Or:

    $ oc edit machineset <machineset> -n openshift-machine-api

    You can alternatively apply the following YAML to scale the compute machine set:

    apiVersion: machine.openshift.io/v1beta1
    kind: MachineSet
    metadata:
      name: <machineset>
      namespace: openshift-machine-api
    spec:
      replicas: 2
Additional resources

Deleting nodes from a bare metal cluster

When you delete a node using the CLI, the node object is deleted in Kubernetes, but the pods that exist on the node are not deleted. Any bare pods not backed by a replication controller become inaccessible to OpenShift Container Platform. Pods backed by replication controllers are rescheduled to other available nodes. You must delete local manifest pods.

Procedure

Delete a node from an OpenShift Container Platform cluster running on bare metal by completing the following steps:

  1. Mark the node as unschedulable:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  2. Drain all pods on the node:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force=true

    This step might fail if the node is offline or unresponsive. Even if the node does not respond, it might still be running a workload that writes to shared storage. To avoid data corruption, power down the physical hardware before you proceed.

  3. Delete the node from the cluster:

    $ oc delete node <node_name>

    Although the node object is now deleted from the cluster, it can still rejoin the cluster after reboot or if the kubelet service is restarted. To permanently delete the node and all its data, you must decommission the node.

  4. If you powered down the physical hardware, turn it back on so that the node can rejoin the cluster.