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In an overcommitted state, the sum of the container compute resource requests and limits exceeds the resources available on the system. For example, you might want to use overcommitment in development environments where a trade-off of guaranteed performance for capacity is acceptable.

Containers can specify compute resource requests and limits. Requests are used for scheduling your container and provide a minimum service guarantee. Limits constrain the amount of compute resource that can be consumed on your node.

The scheduler attempts to optimize the compute resource use across all nodes in your cluster. It places pods onto specific nodes, taking the pods' compute resource requests and nodes' available capacity into consideration.

OpenShift Container Platform administrators can control the level of overcommit and manage container density on nodes. You can configure cluster-level overcommit using the ClusterResourceOverride Operator to override the ratio between requests and limits set on developer containers. In conjunction with node overcommit and project memory and CPU limits and defaults, you can adjust the resource limit and request to achieve the desired level of overcommit.

In OpenShift Container Platform, you must enable cluster-level overcommit. Node overcommitment is enabled by default. See Disabling overcommitment for a node.

Resource requests and overcommitment

For each compute resource, a container may specify a resource request and limit. Scheduling decisions are made based on the request to ensure that a node has enough capacity available to meet the requested value. If a container specifies limits, but omits requests, the requests are defaulted to the limits. A container is not able to exceed the specified limit on the node.

The enforcement of limits is dependent upon the compute resource type. If a container makes no request or limit, the container is scheduled to a node with no resource guarantees. In practice, the container is able to consume as much of the specified resource as is available with the lowest local priority. In low resource situations, containers that specify no resource requests are given the lowest quality of service.

Scheduling is based on resources requested, while quota and hard limits refer to resource limits, which can be set higher than requested resources. The difference between request and limit determines the level of overcommit; for instance, if a container is given a memory request of 1Gi and a memory limit of 2Gi, it is scheduled based on the 1Gi request being available on the node, but could use up to 2Gi; so it is 200% overcommitted.

Cluster-level overcommit using the Cluster Resource Override Operator

The Cluster Resource Override Operator is an admission webhook that allows you to control the level of overcommit and manage container density across all the nodes in your cluster. The Operator controls how nodes in specific projects can exceed defined memory and CPU limits.

You must install the Cluster Resource Override Operator using the OpenShift Container Platform console or CLI as shown in the following sections. During the installation, you create a ClusterResourceOverride custom resource (CR), where you set the level of overcommit, as shown in the following example:

apiVersion: operator.autoscaling.openshift.io/v1
kind: ClusterResourceOverride
metadata:
    name: cluster (1)
spec:
  podResourceOverride:
    spec:
      memoryRequestToLimitPercent: 50 (2)
      cpuRequestToLimitPercent: 25 (3)
      limitCPUToMemoryPercent: 200 (4)
1 The name must be cluster.
2 Optional. If a container memory limit has been specified or defaulted, the memory request is overridden to this percentage of the limit, between 1-100. The default is 50.
3 Optional. If a container CPU limit has been specified or defaulted, the CPU request is overridden to this percentage of the limit, between 1-100. The default is 25.
4 Optional. If a container memory limit has been specified or defaulted, the CPU limit is overridden to a percentage of the memory limit, if specified. Scaling 1Gi of RAM at 100 percent is equal to 1 CPU core. This is processed prior to overriding the CPU request (if configured). The default is 200.

The Cluster Resource Override Operator overrides have no effect if limits have not been set on containers. Create a LimitRange object with default limits per individual project or configure limits in Pod specs for the overrides to apply.

When configured, overrides can be enabled per-project by applying the following label to the Namespace object for each project:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Namespace
metadata:

....

  labels:
    clusterresourceoverrides.admission.autoscaling.openshift.io/enabled: "true"

....

The Operator watches for the ClusterResourceOverride CR and ensures that the ClusterResourceOverride admission webhook is installed into the same namespace as the operator.

Installing the Cluster Resource Override Operator using the web console

You can use the OpenShift Container Platform web console to install the Cluster Resource Override Operator to help control overcommit in your cluster.

Prerequisites
  • The Cluster Resource Override Operator has no effect if limits have not been set on containers. You must specify default limits for a project using a LimitRange object or configure limits in Pod specs for the overrides to apply.

Procedure

To install the Cluster Resource Override Operator using the OpenShift Container Platform web console:

  1. In the OpenShift Container Platform web console, navigate to HomeProjects

    1. Click Create Project.

    2. Specify clusterresourceoverride-operator as the name of the project.

    3. Click Create.

  2. Navigate to OperatorsOperatorHub.

    1. Choose ClusterResourceOverride Operator from the list of available Operators and click Install.

    2. On the Install Operator page, make sure A specific Namespace on the cluster is selected for Installation Mode.

    3. Make sure clusterresourceoverride-operator is selected for Installed Namespace.

    4. Select an Update Channel and Approval Strategy.

    5. Click Install.

  3. On the Installed Operators page, click ClusterResourceOverride.

    1. On the ClusterResourceOverride Operator details page, click Create Instance.

    2. On the Create ClusterResourceOverride page, edit the YAML template to set the overcommit values as needed:

      apiVersion: operator.autoscaling.openshift.io/v1
      kind: ClusterResourceOverride
      metadata:
        name: cluster (1)
      spec:
        podResourceOverride:
          spec:
            memoryRequestToLimitPercent: 50 (2)
            cpuRequestToLimitPercent: 25 (3)
            limitCPUToMemoryPercent: 200 (4)
      1 The name must be cluster.
      2 Optional. Specify the percentage to override the container memory limit, if used, between 1-100. The default is 50.
      3 Optional. Specify the percentage to override the container CPU limit, if used, between 1-100. The default is 25.
      4 Optional. Specify the percentage to override the container memory limit, if used. Scaling 1Gi of RAM at 100 percent is equal to 1 CPU core. This is processed prior to overriding the CPU request, if configured. The default is 200.
    3. Click Create.

  4. Check the current state of the admission webhook by checking the status of the cluster custom resource:

    1. On the ClusterResourceOverride Operator page, click cluster.

    2. On the ClusterResourceOverride Details page, click YAML. The mutatingWebhookConfigurationRef section appears when the webhook is called.

      apiVersion: operator.autoscaling.openshift.io/v1
      kind: ClusterResourceOverride
      metadata:
        annotations:
          kubectl.kubernetes.io/last-applied-configuration: |
            {"apiVersion":"operator.autoscaling.openshift.io/v1","kind":"ClusterResourceOverride","metadata":{"annotations":{},"name":"cluster"},"spec":{"podResourceOverride":{"spec":{"cpuRequestToLimitPercent":25,"limitCPUToMemoryPercent":200,"memoryRequestToLimitPercent":50}}}}
        creationTimestamp: "2019-12-18T22:35:02Z"
        generation: 1
        name: cluster
        resourceVersion: "127622"
        selfLink: /apis/operator.autoscaling.openshift.io/v1/clusterresourceoverrides/cluster
        uid: 978fc959-1717-4bd1-97d0-ae00ee111e8d
      spec:
        podResourceOverride:
          spec:
            cpuRequestToLimitPercent: 25
            limitCPUToMemoryPercent: 200
            memoryRequestToLimitPercent: 50
      status:
      
      ....
      
          mutatingWebhookConfigurationRef: (1)
            apiVersion: admissionregistration.k8s.io/v1beta1
            kind: MutatingWebhookConfiguration
            name: clusterresourceoverrides.admission.autoscaling.openshift.io
            resourceVersion: "127621"
            uid: 98b3b8ae-d5ce-462b-8ab5-a729ea8f38f3
      
      ....
      1 Reference to the ClusterResourceOverride admission webhook.

Installing the Cluster Resource Override Operator using the CLI

You can use the OpenShift Container Platform CLI to install the Cluster Resource Override Operator to help control overcommit in your cluster.

Prerequisites
  • The Cluster Resource Override Operator has no effect if limits have not been set on containers. You must specify default limits for a project using a LimitRange object or configure limits in Pod specs for the overrides to apply.

Procedure

To install the Cluster Resource Override Operator using the CLI:

  1. Create a namespace for the Cluster Resource Override Operator:

    1. Create a Namespace object YAML file (for example, cro-namespace.yaml) for the Cluster Resource Override Operator:

      apiVersion: v1
      kind: Namespace
      metadata:
        name: clusterresourceoverride-operator
    2. Create the namespace:

      $ oc create -f <file-name>.yaml

      For example:

      $ oc create -f cro-namespace.yaml
  2. Create an Operator group:

    1. Create an OperatorGroup object YAML file (for example, cro-og.yaml) for the Cluster Resource Override Operator:

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
      kind: OperatorGroup
      metadata:
        name: clusterresourceoverride-operator
        namespace: clusterresourceoverride-operator
      spec:
        targetNamespaces:
          - clusterresourceoverride-operator
    2. Create the Operator Group:

      $ oc create -f <file-name>.yaml

      For example:

      $ oc create -f cro-og.yaml
  3. Create a subscription:

    1. Create a Subscription object YAML file (for example, cro-sub.yaml) for the Cluster Resource Override Operator:

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
      kind: Subscription
      metadata:
        name: clusterresourceoverride
        namespace: clusterresourceoverride-operator
      spec:
        channel: "4.11"
        name: clusterresourceoverride
        source: redhat-operators
        sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace
    2. Create the subscription:

      $ oc create -f <file-name>.yaml

      For example:

      $ oc create -f cro-sub.yaml
  4. Create a ClusterResourceOverride custom resource (CR) object in the clusterresourceoverride-operator namespace:

    1. Change to the clusterresourceoverride-operator namespace.

      $ oc project clusterresourceoverride-operator
    2. Create a ClusterResourceOverride