×

This reference provides descriptions and example commands for OpenShift CLI (oc) developer commands. For administrator commands, see the OpenShift CLI administrator command reference.

Run oc help to list all commands or run oc <command> --help to get additional details for a specific command.

OpenShift CLI (oc) developer commands

oc annotate

Update the annotations on a resource

Example usage
  # Update pod 'foo' with the annotation 'description' and the value 'my frontend'
  # If the same annotation is set multiple times, only the last value will be applied
  oc annotate pods foo description='my frontend'

  # Update a pod identified by type and name in "pod.json"
  oc annotate -f pod.json description='my frontend'

  # Update pod 'foo' with the annotation 'description' and the value 'my frontend running nginx', overwriting any existing value
  oc annotate --overwrite pods foo description='my frontend running nginx'

  # Update all pods in the namespace
  oc annotate pods --all description='my frontend running nginx'

  # Update pod 'foo' only if the resource is unchanged from version 1
  oc annotate pods foo description='my frontend running nginx' --resource-version=1

  # Update pod 'foo' by removing an annotation named 'description' if it exists
  # Does not require the --overwrite flag
  oc annotate pods foo description-

oc api-resources

Print the supported API resources on the server

Example usage
  # Print the supported API resources
  oc api-resources

  # Print the supported API resources with more information
  oc api-resources -o wide

  # Print the supported API resources sorted by a column
  oc api-resources --sort-by=name

  # Print the supported namespaced resources
  oc api-resources --namespaced=true

  # Print the supported non-namespaced resources
  oc api-resources --namespaced=false

  # Print the supported API resources with a specific APIGroup
  oc api-resources --api-group=extensions

oc api-versions

Print the supported API versions on the server, in the form of "group/version"

Example usage
  # Print the supported API versions
  oc api-versions

oc apply

Apply a configuration to a resource by file name or stdin

Example usage
  # Apply the configuration in pod.json to a pod
  oc apply -f ./pod.json

  # Apply resources from a directory containing kustomization.yaml - e.g. dir/kustomization.yaml
  oc apply -k dir/

  # Apply the JSON passed into stdin to a pod
  cat pod.json | oc apply -f -

  # Note: --prune is still in Alpha
  # Apply the configuration in manifest.yaml that matches label app=nginx and delete all other resources that are not in the file and match label app=nginx
  oc apply --prune -f manifest.yaml -l app=nginx

  # Apply the configuration in manifest.yaml and delete all the other config maps that are not in the file
  oc apply --prune -f manifest.yaml --all --prune-whitelist=core/v1/ConfigMap

oc apply edit-last-applied

Edit latest last-applied-configuration annotations of a resource/object

Example usage
  # Edit the last-applied-configuration annotations by type/name in YAML
  oc apply edit-last-applied deployment/nginx

  # Edit the last-applied-configuration annotations by file in JSON
  oc apply edit-last-applied -f deploy.yaml -o json

oc apply set-last-applied

Set the last-applied-configuration annotation on a live object to match the contents of a file

Example usage
  # Set the last-applied-configuration of a resource to match the contents of a file
  oc apply set-last-applied -f deploy.yaml

  # Execute set-last-applied against each configuration file in a directory
  oc apply set-last-applied -f path/

  # Set the last-applied-configuration of a resource to match the contents of a file; will create the annotation if it does not already exist
  oc apply set-last-applied -f deploy.yaml --create-annotation=true

oc apply view-last-applied

View the latest last-applied-configuration annotations of a resource/object

Example usage
  # View the last-applied-configuration annotations by type/name in YAML
  oc apply view-last-applied deployment/nginx

  # View the last-applied-configuration annotations by file in JSON
  oc apply view-last-applied -f deploy.yaml -o json

oc attach

Attach to a running container

Example usage
  # Get output from running pod mypod; use the 'oc.kubernetes.io/default-container' annotation
  # for selecting the container to be attached or the first container in the pod will be chosen
  oc attach mypod

  # Get output from ruby-container from pod mypod
  oc attach mypod -c ruby-container

  # Switch to raw terminal mode; sends stdin to 'bash' in ruby-container from pod mypod
  # and sends stdout/stderr from 'bash' back to the client
  oc attach mypod -c ruby-container -i -t

  # Get output from the first pod of a replica set named nginx
  oc attach rs/nginx

oc auth can-i

Check whether an action is allowed

Example usage
  # Check to see if I can create pods in any namespace
  oc auth can-i create pods --all-namespaces

  # Check to see if I can list deployments in my current namespace
  oc auth can-i list deployments.apps

  # Check to see if I can do everything in my current namespace ("*" means all)
  oc auth can-i '*' '*'

  # Check to see if I can get the job named "bar" in namespace "foo"
  oc auth can-i list jobs.batch/bar -n foo

  # Check to see if I can read pod logs
  oc auth can-i get pods --subresource=log

  # Check to see if I can access the URL /logs/
  oc auth can-i get /logs/

  # List all allowed actions in namespace "foo"
  oc auth can-i --list --namespace=foo

oc auth reconcile

Reconciles rules for RBAC role, role binding, cluster role, and cluster role binding objects

Example usage
  # Reconcile RBAC resources from a file
  oc auth reconcile -f my-rbac-rules.yaml

oc autoscale

Autoscale a deployment config, deployment, replica set, stateful set, or replication controller

Example usage
  # Auto scale a deployment "foo", with the number of pods between 2 and 10, no target CPU utilization specified so a default autoscaling policy will be used
  oc autoscale deployment foo --min=2 --max=10

  # Auto scale a replication controller "foo", with the number of pods between 1 and 5, target CPU utilization at 80%
  oc autoscale rc foo --max=5 --cpu-percent=80

oc cancel-build

Cancel running, pending, or new builds

Example usage
  # Cancel the build with the given name
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2

  # Cancel the named build and print the build logs
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2 --dump-logs

  # Cancel the named build and create a new one with the same parameters
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2 --restart

  # Cancel multiple builds
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-1 ruby-build-2 ruby-build-3

  # Cancel all builds created from the 'ruby-build' build config that are in the 'new' state
  oc cancel-build bc/ruby-build --state=new

oc cluster-info

Display cluster information

Example usage
  # Print the address of the control plane and cluster services
  oc cluster-info

oc cluster-info dump

Dump relevant information for debugging and diagnosis

Example usage
  # Dump current cluster state to stdout
  oc cluster-info dump

  # Dump current cluster state to /path/to/cluster-state
  oc cluster-info dump --output-directory=/path/to/cluster-state

  # Dump all namespaces to stdout
  oc cluster-info dump --all-namespaces

  # Dump a set of namespaces to /path/to/cluster-state
  oc cluster-info dump --namespaces default,kube-system --output-directory=/path/to/cluster-state

oc completion

Output shell completion code for the specified shell (bash, zsh or fish)

Example usage
  # Installing bash completion on macOS using homebrew
  ## If running Bash 3.2 included with macOS
  brew install bash-completion
  ## or, if running Bash 4.1+
  brew install bash-completion@2
  ## If oc is installed via homebrew, this should start working immediately
  ## If you've installed via other means, you may need add the completion to your completion directory
  oc completion bash > $(brew --prefix)/etc/bash_completion.d/oc


  # Installing bash completion on Linux
  ## If bash-completion is not installed on Linux, install the 'bash-completion' package
  ## via your distribution's package manager.
  ## Load the oc completion code for bash into the current shell
  source <(oc completion bash)
  ## Write bash completion code to a file and source it from .bash_profile
  oc completion bash > ~/.kube/completion.bash.inc
  printf "
  # Kubectl shell completion
  source '$HOME/.kube/completion.bash.inc'
  " >> $HOME/.bash_profile
  source $HOME/.bash_profile

  # Load the oc completion code for zsh[1] into the current shell
  source <(oc completion zsh)
  # Set the oc completion code for zsh[1] to autoload on startup
  oc completion zsh > "${fpath[1]}/_oc"


  # Load the oc completion code for fish[2] into the current shell
  oc completion fish | source
  # To load completions for each session, execute once:
  oc completion fish > ~/.config/fish/completions/oc.fish

  # Load the oc completion code for powershell into the current shell
  oc completion powershell | Out-String | Invoke-Expression
  # Set oc completion code for powershell to run on startup
  ## Save completion code to a script and execute in the profile
  oc completion powershell > $HOME\.kube\completion.ps1
  Add-Content $PROFILE "$HOME\.kube\completion.ps1"
  ## Execute completion code in the profile
  Add-Content $PROFILE "if (Get-Command oc -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue) {
  oc completion powershell | Out-String | Invoke-Expression
  }"
  ## Add completion code directly to the $PROFILE script
  oc completion powershell >> $PROFILE

oc config current-context

Display the current-context

Example usage
  # Display the current-context
  oc config current-context

oc config delete-cluster

Delete the specified cluster from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the minikube cluster
  oc config delete-cluster minikube

oc config delete-context

Delete the specified context from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the context for the minikube cluster
  oc config delete-context minikube

oc config delete-user

Delete the specified user from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the minikube user
  oc config delete-user minikube

oc config get-clusters

Display clusters defined in the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # List the clusters that oc knows about
  oc config get-clusters

oc config get-contexts

Describe one or many contexts

Example usage
  # List all the contexts in your kubeconfig file
  oc config get-contexts

  # Describe one context in your kubeconfig file
  oc config get-contexts my-context

oc config get-users

Display users defined in the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # List the users that oc knows about
  oc config get-users

oc config rename-context

Rename a context from the kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Rename the context 'old-name' to 'new-name' in your kubeconfig file
  oc config rename-context old-name new-name

oc config set

Set an individual value in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Set the server field on the my-cluster cluster to https://1.2.3.4
  oc config set clusters.my-cluster.server https://1.2.3.4

  # Set the certificate-authority-data field on the my-cluster cluster
  oc config set clusters.my-cluster.certificate-authority-data $(echo "cert_data_here" | base64 -i -)

  # Set the cluster field in the my-context context to my-cluster
  oc config set contexts.my-context.cluster my-cluster

  # Set the client-key-data field in the cluster-admin user using --set-raw-bytes option
  oc config set users.cluster-admin.client-key-data cert_data_here --set-raw-bytes=true

oc config set-cluster

Set a cluster entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set only the server field on the e2e cluster entry without touching other values
  oc config set-cluster e2e --server=https://1.2.3.4

  # Embed certificate authority data for the e2e cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --embed-certs --certificate-authority=~/.kube/e2e/kubernetes.ca.crt

  # Disable cert checking for the dev cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --insecure-skip-tls-verify=true

  # Set custom TLS server name to use for validation for the e2e cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --tls-server-name=my-cluster-name

oc config set-context

Set a context entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set the user field on the gce context entry without touching other values
  oc config set-context gce --user=cluster-admin

oc config set-credentials

Set a user entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set only the "client-key" field on the "cluster-admin"
  # entry, without touching other values
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --client-key=~/.kube/admin.key

  # Set basic auth for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --username=admin --password=uXFGweU9l35qcif

  # Embed client certificate data in the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --client-certificate=~/.kube/admin.crt --embed-certs=true

  # Enable the Google Compute Platform auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=gcp

  # Enable the OpenID Connect auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry with additional args
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=oidc --auth-provider-arg=client-id=foo --auth-provider-arg=client-secret=bar

  # Remove the "client-secret" config value for the OpenID Connect auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=oidc --auth-provider-arg=client-secret-

  # Enable new exec auth plugin for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-command=/path/to/the/executable --exec-api-version=client.authentication.k8s.io/v1beta1

  # Define new exec auth plugin args for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-arg=arg1 --exec-arg=arg2

  # Create or update exec auth plugin environment variables for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-env=key1=val1 --exec-env=key2=val2

  # Remove exec auth plugin environment variables for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-env=var-to-remove-

oc config unset

Unset an individual value in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Unset the current-context
  oc config unset current-context

  # Unset namespace in foo context
  oc config unset contexts.foo.namespace

oc config use-context

Set the current-context in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Use the context for the minikube cluster
  oc config use-context minikube

oc config view

Display merged kubeconfig settings or a specified kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Show merged kubeconfig settings
  oc config view

  # Show merged kubeconfig settings and raw certificate data
  oc config view --raw

  # Get the password for the e2e user
  oc config view -o jsonpath='{.users[?(@.name == "e2e")].user.password}'

oc cp

Copy files and directories to and from containers

Example usage
  # !!!Important Note!!!
  # Requires that the 'tar' binary is present in your container
  # image.  If 'tar' is not present, 'oc cp' will fail.
  #
  # For advanced use cases, such as symlinks, wildcard expansion or
  # file mode preservation, consider using 'oc exec'.

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in namespace <some-namespace>
  tar cf - /tmp/foo | oc exec -i -n <some-namespace> <some-pod> -- tar xf - -C /tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo from a remote pod to /tmp/bar locally
  oc exec -n <some-namespace> <some-pod> -- tar cf - /tmp/foo | tar xf - -C /tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo_dir local directory to /tmp/bar_dir in a remote pod in the default namespace
  oc cp /tmp/foo_dir <some-pod>:/tmp/bar_dir

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in a specific container
  oc cp /tmp/foo <some-pod>:/tmp/bar -c <specific-container>

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in namespace <some-namespace>
  oc cp /tmp/foo <some-namespace>/<some-pod>:/tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo from a remote pod to /tmp/bar locally
  oc cp <some-namespace>/<some-pod>:/tmp/foo /tmp/bar

oc create

Create a resource from a file or from stdin

Example usage
  # Create a pod using the data in pod.json
  oc create -f ./pod.json

  # Create a pod based on the JSON passed into stdin
  cat pod.json | oc create -f -

  # Edit the data in docker-registry.yaml in JSON then create the resource using the edited data
  oc create -f docker-registry.yaml --edit -o json

oc create build

Create a new build

Example usage
  # Create a new build
  oc create build myapp

oc create clusterresourcequota

Create a cluster resource quota

Example usage
  # Create a cluster resource quota limited to 10 pods
  oc create clusterresourcequota limit-bob --project-annotation-selector=openshift.io/requester=user-bob --hard=pods=10

oc create clusterrole

Create a cluster role

Example usage
  # Create a cluster role named "pod-reader" that allows user to perform "get", "watch" and "list" on pods
  oc create clusterrole pod-reader --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods

  # Create a cluster role named "pod-reader" with ResourceName specified
  oc create clusterrole pod-reader --verb=get --resource=pods --resource-name=readablepod --resource-name=anotherpod

  # Create a cluster role named "foo" with API Group specified
  oc create clusterrole foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=rs.extensions

  # Create a cluster role named "foo" with SubResource specified
  oc create clusterrole foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods,pods/status

  # Create a cluster role name "foo" with NonResourceURL specified
  oc create clusterrole "foo" --verb=get --non-resource-url=/logs/*

  # Create a cluster role name "monitoring" with AggregationRule specified
  oc create clusterrole monitoring --aggregation-rule="rbac.example.com/aggregate-to-monitoring=true"

oc create clusterrolebinding

Create a cluster role binding for a particular cluster role

Example usage
  # Create a cluster role binding for user1, user2, and group1 using the cluster-admin cluster role
  oc create clusterrolebinding cluster-admin --clusterrole=cluster-admin --user=user1 --user=user2 --group=group1

oc create configmap

Create a config map from a local file, directory or literal value

Example usage
  # Create a new config map named my-config based on folder bar
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=path/to/bar

  # Create a new config map named my-config with specified keys instead of file basenames on disk
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=key1=/path/to/bar/file1.txt --from-file=key2=/path/to/bar/file2.txt

  # Create a new config map named my-config with key1=config1 and key2=config2
  oc create configmap my-config --from-literal=key1=config1 --from-literal=key2=config2

  # Create a new config map named my-config from the key=value pairs in the file
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=path/to/bar

  # Create a new config map named my-config from an env file
  oc create configmap my-config --from-env-file=path/to/foo.env --from-env-file=path/to/bar.env

oc create cronjob

Create a cron job with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a cron job
  oc create cronjob my-job --image=busybox --schedule="*/1 * * * *"

  # Create a cron job with a command
  oc create cronjob my-job --image=busybox --schedule="*/1 * * * *" -- date

oc create deployment

Create a deployment with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the busybox image
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox

  # Create a deployment with a command
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox -- date

  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the nginx image with 3 replicas
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=nginx --replicas=3

  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the busybox image and expose port 5701
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox --port=5701

oc create deploymentconfig

Create a deployment config with default options that uses a given image

Example usage
  # Create an nginx deployment config named my-nginx
  oc create deploymentconfig my-nginx --image=nginx

oc create identity

Manually create an identity (only needed if automatic creation is disabled)

Example usage
  # Create an identity with identity provider "acme_ldap" and the identity provider username "adamjones"
  oc create identity acme_ldap:adamjones

oc create imagestream

Create a new empty image stream

Example usage
  # Create a new image stream
  oc create imagestream mysql

oc create imagestreamtag

Create a new image stream tag

Example usage
  # Create a new image stream tag based on an image in a remote registry
  oc create imagestreamtag mysql:latest --from-image=myregistry.local/mysql/mysql:5.0

oc create ingress

Create an ingress with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a single ingress called 'simple' that directs requests to foo.com/bar to svc
  # svc1:8080 with a tls secret "my-cert"
  oc create ingress simple --rule="foo.com/bar=svc1:8080,tls=my-cert"

  # Create a catch all ingress of "/path" pointing to service svc:port and Ingress Class as "otheringress"
  oc create ingress catch-all --class=otheringress --rule="/path=svc:port"

  # Create an ingress with two annotations: ingress.annotation1 and ingress.annotations2
  oc create ingress annotated --class=default --rule="foo.com/bar=svc:port" \
  --annotation ingress.annotation1=foo \
  --annotation ingress.annotation2=bla

  # Create an ingress with the same host and multiple paths
  oc create ingress multipath --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/=svc:port" \
  --rule="foo.com/admin/=svcadmin:portadmin"

  # Create an ingress with multiple hosts and the pathType as Prefix
  oc create ingress ingress1 --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/path*=svc:8080" \
  --rule="bar.com/admin*=svc2:http"

  # Create an ingress with TLS enabled using the default ingress certificate and different path types
  oc create ingress ingtls --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/=svc:https,tls" \
  --rule="foo.com/path/subpath*=othersvc:8080"

  # Create an ingress with TLS enabled using a specific secret and pathType as Prefix
  oc create ingress ingsecret --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/*=svc:8080,tls=secret1"

  # Create an ingress with a default backend
  oc create ingress ingdefault --class=default \
  --default-backend=defaultsvc:http \
  --rule="foo.com/*=svc:8080,tls=secret1"

oc create job

Create a job with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a job
  oc create job my-job --image=busybox

  # Create a job with a command
  oc create job my-job --image=busybox -- date

  # Create a job from a cron job named "a-cronjob"
  oc create job test-job --from=cronjob/a-cronjob

oc create namespace

Create a namespace with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a new namespace named my-namespace
  oc create namespace my-namespace

oc create poddisruptionbudget

Create a pod disruption budget with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a pod disruption budget named my-pdb that will select all pods with the app=rails label
  # and require at least one of them being available at any point in time
  oc create poddisruptionbudget my-pdb --selector=app=rails --min-available=1

  # Create a pod disruption budget named my-pdb that will select all pods with the app=nginx label
  # and require at least half of the pods selected to be available at any point in time
  oc create pdb my-pdb --selector=app=nginx --min-available=50%

oc create priorityclass

Create a priority class with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a priority class named high-priority
  oc create priorityclass high-priority --value=1000 --description="high priority"

  # Create a priority class named default-priority that is considered as the global default priority
  oc create priorityclass default-priority --value=1000 --global-default=true --description="default priority"

  # Create a priority class named high-priority that cannot preempt pods with lower priority
  oc create priorityclass high-priority --value=1000 --description="high priority" --preemption-policy="Never"

oc create quota

Create a quota with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a new resource quota named my-quota
  oc create quota my-quota --hard=cpu=1,memory=1G,pods=2,services=3,replicationcontrollers=2,resourcequotas=1,secrets=5,persistentvolumeclaims=10

  # Create a new resource quota named best-effort
  oc create quota best-effort --hard=pods=100 --scopes=BestEffort

oc create role

Create a role with single rule

Example usage
  # Create a role named "pod-reader" that allows user to perform "get", "watch" and "list" on pods
  oc create role pod-reader --verb=get --verb=list --verb=watch --resource=pods

  # Create a role named "pod-reader" with ResourceName specified
  oc create role pod-reader --verb=get --resource=pods --resource-name=readablepod --resource-name=anotherpod

  # Create a role named "foo" with API Group specified
  oc create role foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=rs.extensions

  # Create a role named "foo" with SubResource specified
  oc create role foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods,pods/status

oc create rolebinding

Create a role binding for a particular role or cluster role

Example usage
  # Create a role binding for user1, user2, and group1 using the admin cluster role
  oc create rolebinding admin --clusterrole=admin --user=user1 --user=user2 --group=group1

oc create route edge

Create a route that uses edge TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create an edge route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route edge my-route --service=frontend

  # Create an edge route that exposes the frontend service and specify a path
  # If the route name is omitted, the service name will be used
  oc create route edge --service=frontend --path /assets

oc create route passthrough

Create a route that uses passthrough TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create a passthrough route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route passthrough my-route --service=frontend

  # Create a passthrough route that exposes the frontend service and specify
  # a host name. If the route name is omitted, the service name will be used
  oc create route passthrough --service=frontend --hostname=www.example.com

oc create route reencrypt

Create a route that uses reencrypt TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create a route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route reencrypt my-route --service=frontend --dest-ca-cert cert.cert

  # Create a reencrypt route that exposes the frontend service, letting the
  # route name default to the service name and the destination CA certificate
  # default to the service CA
  oc create route reencrypt --service=frontend

oc create secret docker-registry

Create a secret for use with a Docker registry

Example usage
  # If you don't already have a .dockercfg file, you can create a dockercfg secret directly by using:
  oc create secret docker-registry my-secret --docker-server=DOCKER_REGISTRY_SERVER --docker-username=DOCKER_USER --docker-password=DOCKER_PASSWORD --docker-email=DOCKER_EMAIL

  # Create a new secret named my-secret from ~/.docker/config.json
  oc create secret docker-registry my-secret --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=path/to/.docker/config.json

oc create secret generic

Create a secret from a local file, directory, or literal value

Example usage
  # Create a new secret named my-secret with keys for each file in fol